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Dying Rowan Tree

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  • Pat.Pat. Posts: 1

    I have a rowan that overall appears to be in good health and as I write is covered in developing berries. However the bark of one large branch is badly split and this damage is starting to creep down the trunk. The damaged branch has had foliage in previous years but this year is completely bare. A neighbour tells me that it might be a fungal infection caused by pruning. Should I amputate the damaged branch, and if so, would it save the tree?

  • I have a rowan tree which is at least 20 years old and which ordinarily produces plenty of red berries.  This year, however, for the first time ever, only one side of the tree is covered in leaves; the other side is bare, save for a generous coverage of ivy which has steadily over the years grown up each of the stems on the side that is now bare.  Most of these stems are now discoloured (orange) and the bark is soft and spongy.  Bark on main trunk has also started to split, revealing a rusty brown colour beneath.  Any advice as to what I should do (if anything)?

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Posts: 87,874

    Pat - if the rot has spread back to the trunk I'm not sure that there's anything that can be done.  Could you post a picture for us to have a look at please?

     

    Paul - I'm sorry but it does sound as if your rowan is on its last legs.  image


    Gardening in Central Norfolk on improved gritty moraine over chalk ... free-draining.





  • LandlubberLandlubber Posts: 396

    Never realised Rowan trees suffered from all these problems, maybe I will think twice about having oneimage

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Posts: 87,874

    Most trees are susceptible to various problems if they are not growing well and under stress.  However a tree that is in good condition and growing strongly is usually able to throw off  most bacteria/fungal attacks etc.


    Gardening in Central Norfolk on improved gritty moraine over chalk ... free-draining.





  • PJ85PJ85 Posts: 8

    My Rowan tree has got a disease that I would like some help in identifying if possible?  I think that it is probably leaf spot or fire blight but I am not sure.  The leaves have been developing brown spots and some defoliation has started.  The bark does not seem particularly bad and I cannot see any signs of honey fungus when I cut a little bark away. I have cut away a couple of branches and there is some dark stains inside the branches.  If it is leaf spot does anyone know how to tell if this is caused by bacteria or fungus? I would like to treat the tree if it can be saved but I need to identify the exact problem first.

     

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  • PJ85PJ85 Posts: 8

    Thanks for your advice Charlie November.  My only concern is that it has been infected a while, since I have only recently moved to this property and noticed it.  There may be nothing left that is not infected.

     

  • CLEMOCLEMO Posts: 1

    I wish I could be of help as it might thow some light on my problem. My Rowan which has yellow berries has been ok untill this year when it has developed dropsy, all the leaves are dropping off one at a time.  We inherited it some two years ago so can't be sure of its age but I think about 15-17 years going by the age of the property.  We are in a very clay laden area in South Devon.

    CLEMO

  • I'm having similar problems with my two rowans that have been there since the house was built about 50 years ago.

    This year there are hardly any leaves or berries, the leaves are spotted brown and the bark is splitting away from the trunk.  

    From what I've read here, it sounds like a combination of fire blight and leaf spot - is that possible?

  • Hi Allybee image

    It sounds as if your rowans are coming to the end of their life.  They're not long-lived trees http://treesforlife.org.uk/forest/species-profiles/rowan/


    Gardening in Central Norfolk on improved gritty moraine over chalk ... free-draining.





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