The blue 'Privacy settings' box in the bottom right corner is a new legal requirement under GDPR (General Data Protection Regulation). It can’t be dismissed or hidden as the idea is that it must be easy to access at all times should you wish to change your settings.

Floppy Rose

lilly3lilly3 Posts: 49

I have a two year old rose, "Wild Eve". It seems healthy and flowers freely but has an odd habit. All the stems arch and spread on the ground. Consequently the flowers, which are heavy, face down and push their faces into the soil! Is this because it's a young plant, will it grow up and start acting like a proper rose or will I have to prop it up somehow?

«1

Posts

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 45,931

    It's description on David Austin's website says that it has a long arching growth habit and can be used as a groundcover rose - I would imagine that as it grows it will build up a framework of arching branches on top of each other which will support them new ones - at the moment as it's smaller this hasn't happened.  You  could support them for the time being in order to enjoy t he blooms - you could email or write to David Austin describing what's happening and ask for their advice as to the best way to grow this rosehttp://www.davidaustinroses.com/english/Showrose.asp?Showr=4077

    If you stop taking chances, you'll stay where you sit. You won't live any longer, but it'll feel like it.” 
  • lilly3lilly3 Posts: 49

    Thanks for your advice Dovefromabove. I had a look on the D. Austin web site and read the same description, which is a bit misleading as the tag on the rose when I bought it says small shrub approx 3 feet high!! I will email them as you suggest, and I'll just have to wait until it gets bigger maybe.image

  • I have a 'Lady Emma Hamilton' which I grew in a container for a couple of years and planted into the garden this year.  It's virtually flat with the rain but I'm hoping that as it grows into it's new space, the stems will strengthen to hold the weight of the flowers, or even better, that the second flowering won't be scuppered by rain for weeks on end!

  • Gracie5Gracie5 Posts: 125

    I had a David Austin 'Pat Austin' growing in a large container and with a lot of their roses, the stems were far too spindly to hold the very large flower.  It must have something to do with the grafting process but it wasn't a good look and have since only bought more sturdy varieties.

  • PalaisglidePalaisglide Posts: 3,297

    One answer is to push some twiggy stick support into the ground under the plant to lift it and take the weight of the flower heads.
    Prune out some of the spindly stems to allow the others to thicken, when the flowers are finished prune back a third in Autumn and then take out the spindles in spring, it should in time get stronger.

    Frank.

  • lilly3lilly3 Posts: 49

    Thanks for all the advice , seems it's a common problem. Looks as if I'll have to wait for it to grow up.

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 45,931

    I think it may be something to do with a lot of the David Austin 'old fashioned' type roses having rambler and similar types in their family tree.

    If you stop taking chances, you'll stay where you sit. You won't live any longer, but it'll feel like it.” 
  • Shrinking VioletShrinking Violet Posts: 919

    I read of a technique in America where the arching stems were effectively "trained" into arches around the central stems by pinning them down (think pumpkin shape).  The stems then sent up flowering shoots which gave a thickened and prolific appearance.  I wish I could remember the name of the technique or guide you to a website, but it was some time ago.  I meant to earmark it for future reference.  Full of good intentions, me!

  • Shrinking Violet wrote (see)

    I read of a technique in America where the arching stems were effectively "trained" into arches around the central stems by pinning them down (think pumpkin shape).  The stems then sent up flowering shoots which gave a thickened and prolific appearance.  I wish I could remember the name of the technique or guide you to a website, but it was some time ago.  I meant to earmark it for future reference.  Full of good intentions, me!

    I've read about this technique but had forgotten it. Thanks for reminding everyone about it. I have a spindly David Austin rose, too, and will be doing this. Brilliant! It seems that this is a feature of a number of 'English roses' - something I'll watch out for in future. The other problem with my rose (forgotten the name - old age!) is that it looks pretty bare after its main flush of flowering in June - not much leaf, even, more like an old rose.

  • Tina5Tina5 Posts: 46

    I have a few D Austin roses, and yes, some do 'flop' a bit. One that was especially lazy last year is doing better this year though, still a bit floppy, but as the bush is older and bigger, the blooms are staying clear of the ground. I have Ferdinand Picard which always behaves impeccably though, and is a beauty!

«1
Sign In or Register to comment.