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Bell Pepper Issue

TFlowes drop off at the base either before or shortly after opening so the fruits do not for. They are adjacent to a chilli which has long well formed fruits so growing conditions are the same for both. Where am I going wrong what should I do with them 

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  • BobTheGardenerBobTheGardener Leicestershire, UKPosts: 11,066

    Try using a small soft brush to hand-pollinate the flowers as soon as they open.  I always do this and have had 100% fruit set so far this year.  All you need to do is very gently push the brush into each and every open flower.

    A trowel in the hand is worth a thousand lost under a bush.
  • didnt get any more flowers to try the brush, have a lovely bushy green plant no flowers and no peppers  what did i do wrong? feel let down as this year as I started late spent £3.49 on a plant but have planted fed and watered for weeks and only rewarded with green growth no fruits. 

  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 18,445

    Next year try just taking seeds from a bought one, they germinate very well on the windowsill when they are fresh, then dont feed until you see the flower buds, you've made it lazy. Feed with tomato feed .

    Supermarket sweet peppers

    image

     

    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • if i keep the green house warm is there any chance of late flowers and fruits r just get rid of it now 

  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 18,445

    You may lose the season now Philippa, but down here we are forecast a good warm week, you may be lucky, I dont know what they are called, they were from Lidl or tesco but they all came true. Last couple of years I have grown the bell type ad John has, they came true from their seed as well.

    John, I would say you may as well chuck em, its took late for flowers to come if they hadnt already.  Start next year with a free one, just dry the seed off a bit and put it in a pot, slightly cover with compost, put on windowsill and wait, prick out in 3 inch pots when

     they are about 2 inches tall or when the second leaves form, then wait till the roots fill the pot before potting on, if you put them in a too big a pot they wont grow for you, they will just get straggley. Treat them like a tomato plant. Pot on gradually until they are in 8/10 inch pots put a strong cane in.

    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 18,445

    Yes same here!

    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • Mrs GMrs G Posts: 336

    I read that you can actually keep pepper and chilli plants in the house/green house with fleece over winter and they will survive, they are not an annual.  So I'll be getting keeping mine that I did from seed this year and see of they live.

  • Mrs GMrs G Posts: 336

    Here is a good link giving instructions on how to overwinter them. image

  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 18,445

    I cant see the link!

    I find after they have produced so much fruit, the plant looks just about spent. So easy to grow from seed, I wouldnt use up the space.

    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • Mrs GMrs G Posts: 336

    http://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/pepper/overwintering-peppers.htm

    The peppers are meant to be bigger in the second year.  I don't see the point of throwing a decent plant out of you do have the room.  We've got that many house plants that two more won't make much difference!

     

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