New Allotment

Eeekkk ...I am sooo excited....., off to look at not 1, but 3 possible allotment sites. Have been on the waiting list for 2 years and today got the "phone call" from the site manager so going to meet her on Monday to check them out. (must be like buses, nothing for ages and then 3 come at once!!)imageWhats great is that this site is just along the road from where I live, so I can walk there and its quite small and cosy and sheltered. She has warned me they are a bit overgrown, but thats ok. Any suggestions what to avoid or look out for. I hope to get a shed and nearby water source.imageimageimage happy digging folks xx


  • philippa smith2philippa smith2 Posts: 6,092

    Gina.......I'd look at all 3 sites before you decide........

    1st would be security..........who has access, how do you access, etc.

    2nd  what do the other allotments look like..........well kept or overgrown

    3rd  What can you erect........little sheds, g/houses etc

    4th Is water available

    last but not least, is it allowed to keep Poultry on site.............some people just have allotments for Poultry and you may as well think on in case you wish to do the same.

    Best of luck and I really do hope you enjoy your "patch"image

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 42,783

    All of the above, but also check for pernicious weeds such as Horse tail, Japanese Knotweed, ground elder and bindweed.  

    The second two can be dealt with, but personally I wouldn't take on an allotment with either of the first two.

    Also I'd think twice about an allotment bounded by a large hedge or trees - roots can be a real nuisance. 

    But ... how exciting!!!  Good luck image

    Gardening is cheaper than therapy, and you get tomatoes. 
  • ginagibbsginagibbs Posts: 756

    Thanks guys, will keep all your comments in mindimage

  • SweetPea93SweetPea93 Posts: 446

    brambles. We've had our allotments for three weeks now and all we've done is dig out brambles. They are hard work. You're unlikely to inherit a well kept one, but it's easier to dig out and rid one's site of grasses, danndies and the such, even if it's full of grass, than it is a reasonably dead looking site full of bramble roots. Ask questions such as when was the plot last used, what did they grow, etc. You might be surprised at what your site rep remembers.

    Remember size isn't everything, we have a massive plot, but it's right next to the site's access, which given the choice I'd change for a smaller plot that's a little safer from intruders and nosey allotmenteers, though most are lovely!

    Have fun, enjoy the experience!

  • philippa smith2philippa smith2 Posts: 6,092 always, you come up with the stuff I should have included but didn't image

    Having just returned from my "patch" where \I am still clearing grass and weeds ( only took over a couple of months ago) I count myself lucky as the worst so far is just the usual stuff including Bindweed. 

    Some allotment societies seem to be very rigorous about the state of the allotments whilst others are really quite casual.  Our allotments only number 12 and 4 of these are really just for poultry.........which personally I quite like as I am so used to chatting to my own Chickens when I'm working in the garden, it's nice to chat to other's chickens on the allotmentimage last thing I would say is that if you could take a look around your proposed sites when there is a chance of other allotment holders being present is a good idea to chat to them and find what works, etc.image



  • ginagibbsginagibbs Posts: 756

    Thanks for all the above, some good things to consider. It seems quite a secure site with locked gates and a track leading to them so its not near the road, it also looks very organized (there are only about 20 plots). I am not sure how long these particular plots have been left, so I will have to wait and see on Monday. Keep you all posted, till then have a lovely weekend folksimage

    p.s No sign of chickens so will have to ask about that!


  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 42,783

    Sometimes allotment holders club together to get a trailer-load of manure delivered from a farm - it might be worthwhile asking if that sort of thing goes on image

    Gardening is cheaper than therapy, and you get tomatoes. 
  • ginagibbsginagibbs Posts: 756

    Hi Dove, got my own supply, I exercise a friends horse for her, so get as much as I can shove in the boot of the car each time I go riding!! Might be worth seeing if anyone else wants any though as I cant use all of it (they've got 6 horses!).

    I walked the dogs past the site last night and it only takes 7 mins by foot from my house. image


  • SweetPea93SweetPea93 Posts: 446

    Trade manure for plants, or even shared usage of a neighbours shed if you don't have your own.

    Look into the 'get composting' site, they have very cheap compost bins that are delivered to your door.

  • GWRSGWRS Posts: 5,105

    If you have a shed think about water butts , even if you have water on tap , sometimes rain water can be better for some plants

    I got 2 via the Water company they where on special offer , also you can buy water cubes big containers 

    Only advice is don't try and clear it all in one go , do a bit at a time

     best of luck image

  • Steve 309Steve 309 Posts: 2,754

    Yes - de-weed a bit at a time but do it thoroughly.  Then get something in it.  It's probably too late for spuds but I daresay someone will come up with some good ideas.  Green manure if nothing else.  Beans.

  • ginagibbsginagibbs Posts: 756

    Thanks again, will have to take things a bit steady as the old back wont take too much punishment. I am sure lovely hubby will give a hand. I have got some stuff ready to go in that are in pots in the greenhouse at the moment, so should have something to grow!image

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