Cornus Canadensis

LesleyKLesleyK Posts: 4,029

Has anyone tried growing these as ground cover. They look great but I don't want to introduce another thug into the garden. Thanks.

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  • PalustrisPalustris Posts: 3,199

    I grow it and struggle to keep it going, even in the woodland situation it is supposed to enjoy. They are also very expensive to buy.

  • LesleyKLesleyK Posts: 4,029

    Thanks Berghill. Just took a moment to see where in the country you are.  I am in Scotland between Edinburgh and Glasgow.  I thought that as other cornus seem to do well on our damp clay I would give it a go but was worried it might be rampant!

    I am going to Gardening Scotland tomorrow and will see if they have any (and at what price) and see if OH will treat meimage  

  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 19,335

    I've given up.  I've tried two lots of 3 but made a mistake the first time and put it in too much sun.  The second lot were planted in my "woodland" corner and did OK for a couple of years but failed last year after a very hard winter followed by a  warm bit of early spring and then another deep freeze..

    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • LesleyKLesleyK Posts: 4,029

    It looked so lovely at Chelsea and I need a bit of ground cover in a shady spot.  Looks as though I am being over-ambitious as I'm not known for my skills in keeping difficult plants alive.  Do you have any suggestions as to what he can spend his money onimage

  • hogweedhogweed Central ScotlandPosts: 3,963

    I'm in central Scotland and I have tried it a couple of times. Both times I failed even though it was in a fairly sheltered semi shady spot.

     

    'Optimism is the faith that leads to achievement' - Helen Keller
  • hogweedhogweed Central ScotlandPosts: 3,963

    Also had no success with pachysandra, another ground cover plant.

    'Optimism is the faith that leads to achievement' - Helen Keller
  • LesleyKLesleyK Posts: 4,029

    This forum is brilliant - I could be throwing my money away without all your help.  One thing I'm having a bit of success with is brunnera Jack Frost.  I bought one plant two years ago and now have six decent sized clumps under a large acer. It must be easy.

  • ambodachambodach Posts: 18

    Hi LesletK - I'm going to be at Gardening Scotland tomorrow morning on the Scottish Rock Garden Club stand.  I had to check on what Cornus Canadensis looked like and think there is some of it on our display.  It might be worth coming to the stand and see if anyone is around who knows this plant.

    Rob

  • LesleyKLesleyK Posts: 4,029

    Hi ambodach - good of you to get in touch.  I'm pretty close to you by the looks of it.  I will come and look at the stand - I don't want to miss anything.  Fingers crossed for good weatherimage

  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 19,335

    For ground cover in shade you should try geranium macrorhizum which has scented leaves which turn red in winter and then produces fresh leaves and pale or deep pink flowers in spring, depending on variety.

    Geranium Kashmir white is another goody and you can try the variegated form of ground elder which lightens up a dark spot but has softer foliage and stems and is not invasive like its weed cousin.   Easy to control especally if you remove the flowers - Aegopodium podagraria variegatum.

    Epimediums do well in shade too if you can provide plenty of well rotted organic matter to enrich the soil - garden compost or manure will do.

    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
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