Supports for morning glory and other climbers

Hi all I had to cut down a beautiful forsythia today to make room for my potting shed, so hard to do but had to be done( I made OH wait until lit had flowered)

i was wondering if I could use the branches, some over 6 feet as supports for beans etc. they are vey pliable  at the moment, but when they dry out will they be strong enough?

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  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 53,167

    I think they might be ok for short to medium height peas - they need twiggy growth, but I doubt if they'd support the weight of runner beans etc. 

    You could make a loose wigwam of them for Morning Glories or trailing nasturtiums to scramble over -  they're not too heavy and could look quite pretty. 

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 20,294

    tsk tsk Dove, lol. We've already discussed the fact that wigwams are round, and it's teepees which are pointed. xx

    Devon.
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 53,167

    I used the term advisedly Hostafan - I was thinking of a dome-like structure image

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • Orchid LadyOrchid Lady Posts: 5,800

    Alan Titchmarsh called it a wigwam the other week in a gardening programme, so I'm sticking with wigwam image

    I'm wondering what to support my Morning glory with before I plant them out in a couple of weeks.  The earlier sown ones are spreading and winding themselves around my courgettes, blind openers thingy and anything the can get at!!  I have to keep unravelling them image

  • BalBal Posts: 93

    Thanks allimage

  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 20,294

    OL, just because lots of people make the same mistake, doesn't stop it being a mistake: even the great AT. For example Carol Klein, much as I love her is fond of the expression " rising to a crescendo" the crescendo IS the rising part, it rises to a climax.

     

    Off back to Pedants' Corner. xx

    Devon.
  • Orchid LadyOrchid Lady Posts: 5,800

    Point taken Hosta, but when are taught a word means something from being tiny it is quite hard it suddenly change your mind set 40 years later image Even now if you google wigwam it shows the structures which are teepees, as long as we all know what we mean it doesn't matter really in the grand scheme of things image

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 53,167

    It's like a discussion  on another thread - the word 'weed' used to mean herb or grass (in other words, any plant that wasn't a bush or a tree) - it wasn't until the Middle Ages that it came to mean 'something growing where it's not wanted'.

    One of my favourite books is Melvin Bragg's The Adventure of English. image

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • Orchid LadyOrchid Lady Posts: 5,800

    I learned a few years ago Dove that a weed is a plant that we don't want, so although I love buttercups, if they were in my veg patch they would be a weed, in a meadow they are beautiful flower image I never knew it originally meant grass or herb though, we learn someone new every day image (I missed that other great by the way)

  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 20,294

    Don't you just love the English language? xx 

    Devon.
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