Potash

I burned some wood/garden plant remains in an incinerator a few weeks back and kept the ashes in a bag.  Is this potash?  so for instance, if it says a potash feed every two weeks is good for my Marketmore cucumbers, could I just mix it with water and pour on?  Or is it more complicated than that?

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  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 54,460

    I tend to add it to the soil when I spread my home-made compost on the veg garden.

    Some good info here http://www.growveg.com/growblogpost.aspx?id=217 

    image

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • Busy Bee2Busy Bee2 Posts: 1,005

    Thanks Dove.  I added some to the big veg bed this year, just wondering how to apply to the cucumbers.  Will have a read image

  • WelshonionWelshonion Posts: 3,114

    A potash feed is what you get in commercial Tomato feed.  It is not the same as wood ash, though that is valuable in the garden.

  • Busy Bee2Busy Bee2 Posts: 1,005

    Okay, well I will just feed the cucumbers with tomato feed then.  image

  • PalaisglidePalaisglide Posts: 3,414

    Be very careful, wood ash can contain metals from paint, Potassium which with added Calcium becomes Caustic Potash or Soda Ash once used in soap.

    Would I add to my plants no says an ex-ICI man. Look at the packet your bought fertilizer comes in and you will see N-nitrogen, P- Potash, K-Potassium, usually the N will be the higher number apart from Tomato feed when the numbers will be closer.

    In the days we could burn old wood and anything else to get rid of it we put the ash into a midden with the fresh manure which meant it would be a year or more before it went into the ground. Burnt wood ash can act like lime on a garden so not for Rhododendrons then or any acid loving plant. Today I would add it to the green bag for the corporation to deal with, I would ask is it worth risking your plants.

    Frank.

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 54,460

    I assumed from BusyBee's question that the wood was garden rubbish, sticks, prunings etc. 

    Timber (being heart wood) does not yield much potash - it's the ash from sticks, twigs etc the stuff of a traditional garden bonfire, that is beneficial. 

    image

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • BizzieBBizzieB Posts: 885

    My neighbours and I share ash from a combined bonfire (the one with the biggest garden hosts the fire!) All woody prunings go on the fire. I use the ash for my roses.

    Good web link for compost Dove, thanks.

  • PalaisglidePalaisglide Posts: 3,414

    All I say is be careful, my Daughter was burning old brush wood pruning's etc, went out and left it and on coming back found her husband burning old fencing. we know not what we burn. Ash can concentrate the metals found naturally in some wood. Potassium is a natural occurring acid in Bananas and other fruits also in wood, I cannot eat Bananas and some plants hate potassium. Is it worth risking your plants for something which could or not be harmful unless we did a full test who knows what it contains, bin it.

    Frank.

  • Busy Bee2Busy Bee2 Posts: 1,005

    It was a dead tree and the dead twinings of an 'old man's beard' that was growing up the tree.  That was all.

  • ommthreeommthree Posts: 314

    Just a quick comment on the NPK business: The P is actually phosphorus. Potash is  basically the same thing as potassium (K).

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