Curly leaves on my plum

lydiaannlydiaann Posts: 274

I do hope someone can help with this.  I know peaches, nectarines and that family have leaf curl, but why is my plum also suffering a similar fate.  It's a minarette, been in the garden for 2 years - this is its 3rd fruiting season.  Actually, we only had 2 plums last year but this year the blossom has been really good and we were expecting our first 'real' crop.  However, now the leaves are curling, starting at the top.  I have examined most of the tree and can find nothing behind any of the leaves - insects, mould, 'fur' - and those leaves that have not yet succumbed appear to be in rude health (but will they remain that way?).  The soil is amended (organically) clay.  There is a 'heritage hedge' directly behind the tree, mainly hawthorn, healthy ash, elder, hornbeam and the tree is sheltered from the north by a garden shed.  It loses sunshine by about 2 p.m. (because of same 'hedge') but still gets plenty of light.  Any ideas please?

Posts

  • http://i27.photobucket.com/albums/c186/DavidKnapper/BEV1568_LEAF_CURLING_PLUM_APHID_DAMAGE_TO_DAMSON_LEAVES_zps327bab59.jpg

     Googled image:

    This is fairly typical.

     

    Hi, lydiaann.....I'm almost sure this will as a result of a plum aphid infestation, look closely for them.  I would recommend a spraying of a systemic insecticide such as 'Bug Clear'.

    Good luck.

  • lydiaannlydiaann Posts: 274

    Are you sure, David, that you didn't leap into my garden and take a pic of MY plum tree?!!!  image  This is exactly what is happening!  Thanks so much for that, I'll go out and get some tomorrow.  Hopefully, it won't have affected the fruit.

     

  • PalustrisPalustris Posts: 3,199

    Not keen on spraying with a systemic insecticide on something I want to eat. We get this every year and ignore it. The trees produce their fruit without seeming to come to any harm.

    Just watch out for ants 'farming ' the aphids and take steps to stop the ants from climbing the tree and moving the aphids to new leaves.

  • Berghill wrote (see)

    Not keen on spraying with a systemic insecticide on something I want to eat. We get this every year and ignore it. The trees produce their fruit without seeming to come to any harm.

    Just watch out for ants 'farming ' the aphids and take steps to stop the ants from climbing the tree and moving the aphids to new leaves.

    I totally agree, Bergill and I do understand that spraying isn't for everyone. Although the fruit isn't affected, it does look unsightly, especially when sooty mould colonises the honeydew secreted by these aphids.

    I don't use sprays lightly, but when I do,  'Bug Clear' is my choice because it is as environmentally friendly as they come. 

  • PalustrisPalustris Posts: 3,199

    I have been known to spray with an insecticidal soap made from plants and that does offer some respite. Not easy to get the stuff inside the leaves though where the aphids hide.

     

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