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Himalayan Balsam

ightenighten Posts: 184

This bane of my life is all over the fields and woods again.. Anyone ever got it to go away for ever.. Problem is I think it just flows down the stream

Posts

  • Tropical SamTropical Sam Posts: 1,493

    Problem all over, eps near waterways. A lot of Giant Hogweed near me.

  • DorsetUKDorsetUK Posts: 441

    Loads of it in the Frome which flows through the village.  And yes the seeds burst out, into the water and next news it's all the way from source to sea.  At least the Giant Hogweed isn't quite so prolific.  Funny thing though some time ago.  Village flower show and a distressed small girl came running up to me to say her wild flower bouquet was being rejected by the judge as her HB wasn't a wild flower!!  I soon sorted that though image

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 58,865

    When we lived in Studentland a next door neighbour did that Mike - three years later when he'd moved on the landlord had to employ men to come and spray and clear the garden, then he had it covered with membrane and shingle.  

    By then other gardens along the street were also infested image

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • Jim MacdJim Macd Posts: 750

    Yes, gardeners and plant hunters have a lot to answer for!!! Not to mention people who release cute, fury creatures that eat everything in sight and dirve out our natives.

  • Bee witchedBee witched Scottish BordersPosts: 491

    Can I just put a plea in for Himalayan Balsam?

    This is a superb honey bee plant .... a great late summer nectar source.

    I live on a river and the bees actively seek it out .... I can tell when they've been to the balsam as they all come back to the hive covered in white pollen like little white ghosts!

    Makes great honey too ... so all in all a smashing plant in my opinion!

     

    Bees must gather nectar from two million flowers to make one pound of honey   
  • ightenighten Posts: 184

    No... image

     

    TBF there is plenty of it on the far side of the field beyond the stream.. Trouble is its just so aggresive and grows anywhere, regardless of there being any soil.. It will mass itself even on concrete.

    Its fairly easy to pull up but we have found you have to do it before it has reached flower (don't wait until its 4 foot tall and strim it like our farmer neighbour did last year).. It has a built in defence that if its cut when ready to set seed it actually explodes its seeds out)... Wait until its a foot or so tall then go around every day pulling it up from the base.. It only roots a few millimetres down. Then burn it (sorry bees).

     

    Trouble is this is becoming a yearly chore, it just seems to come back (probably washed down the stream from farms and fields above us)

     

     

  • Jim MacdJim Macd Posts: 750
    Bee witched wrote (see)

    Can I just put a plea in for Himalayan Balsam?

    This is a superb honey bee plant .... a great late summer nectar source.

    I live on a river and the bees actively seek it out .... I can tell when they've been to the balsam as they all come back to the hive covered in white pollen like little white ghosts!

    Makes great honey too ... so all in all a smashing plant in my opinion!

     

    To quote ighton NO!. image

     

    There are loads of plants that are native and provide nectar and pollen, unfortunately the native ones which support a great deal more than bees are being driven out of existence by it. The bees survived in  Britain for thousands of years without Himalayan Balsam but I'm not sure if you'll be able to say the same thing for all the wildlife that depends on out native flora. It's thinking only of our own needs that got us into this mess. My opinion doesn't matter one jot, only facts and common sense, thankfully.

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