Forum home Plants

Sprig's Garden

Sprig2Sprig2 Posts: 74

As some of you were kind enough to show an interest in the story of my garden when I posted some pics the other day, as promised, here is a thread to tell you the story so far. I also hope to update this regularly to show progress and ask advice as I go along. This is very much a work in progress.

We are in Wiltshire, on the edge of Salisbury Plain. We live in an old house that has been split in to four flats. We have half of the downstairs and our garden would have originally been part of the kitchen garden of the house. We moved here in May last year. The house has been empty for a year prior to that as the elderly gentleman who lived here had died . Unfortunately I did not think to get proper 'before' photos of the garden. However the first big project was to fell some leylandii and cypress trees that were well past their best and I do have before and after shots of that. Prior to taking these trees down we also removed lots of huge and terribly neglected shrubs up against the wall running down the side of the garden. I wish I had before pics of this but just imagine the shrubs taking up the whole width of the bed that is there now (in later pics) and going up to and above the height of the wall.

The house is Grade II Listed and in a conservation area so we had to apply for permission to take these down but thankfully there were no objections.

Before.

image

 

image

  

image

 Cypress gone.

image

 Leylandii gone.

image

 I think I will do this in instalments so as not to overload you. Of for a tea break and back soon for more.

«134

Posts

  • Sprig2Sprig2 Posts: 74

    The next job was to plant a hedge along the side of the garden where the leylandii were. The plan was to put little beech whips in and patiently wait for them to grow. However luck was on my side and I found 75 beech hedging plants on Ebay not far from us, being sold by a landscaper who had them left over from another project. So £250 pounds later and a trip out with the horse trailer to collect them we had a ready made hedge just ready for planting. We are lucky here that out soil is quite sandy but also seems to be pretty fertile (maybe due to being part of the old kitchen garden) so it was pretty easy to dig the holes and put the hedging plants in.

    Getting there.

    image

    Smart looking hedge.

    image

     I did not stake them as I did not really have funds for stakes and touch wood they seem to have been fine. Typically just after I put them in we had all that really wet and windy weather. I did wonder if I should tie them to the hedge but as they are quite busy they did a good job of holding each other up. I did periodically walk along the line and tread down any that looked like they had been moving around but they all seem fine.

    It had been discussed buying some smaller plants to finish off the run to the end of the garden but actually I like it as it is as we still keep our views up to Salisbury Plain.

    Alongside the hedge project we have also been filling in the pond. It was actually a very nice pond but I have a 3 year old son so just could not risk keeping it. Luckily when they dug the pond the spoil was placed next to the pond and turned in to a rockery so we did not have to import anything to fill it with. The pond was large, maybe about 6ft by 10ft and 3ft deep. There were 3 resident fish who are now happily living next door (apparently that is where they started life anyway). We cut out the old liner, put as much stone and rubble in the bottom and then started putting the earth back. This was done over a few months and it settled a bit at each stage. The final bit was probably done at the end of Jan and then grass seed was put down 3 or 4 weeks ago, which is just starting to come through.

    image

     

     

  • nutcutletnutcutlet PeterboroughPosts: 26,093

    That's all coming on nicely Sprigimage

  • Sprig2Sprig2 Posts: 74

    Last year I spent a lot of time hanging around the garden centres and picked up good sized perennials that had been reduced to £2 or £3 after they had flowered. They all went in to the west facing bed by the wall. This spring these have been a source of lots of new plants for the other beds.

    image

     

    image

     I have created a new bed on the side where the Leylandii were. It was a bit of a nightmare to dig out as there was lots of ivy and also left over roots from some big shrubs that had been at the end near the greenhouse. Anyway, at last it was clear:

    image

     Perennials laid out roughly where I want them (annuals are being grown from seed in the greenhouse and poly tunnel to fill the gaps).

    image

     And planted up. 

    image

     That was this weekend's project. As that cleared space on the patio I have evicted most of the larger seedlings from the greenhouse as I have some more seeds that need pricking out and nowhere to put them. I doubt we will get frost here now but if it looks like getting chilly at night I can always tuck them in with some fleece.

     

    Now some pics from today (not as sunny as it has been unfortunately) to give you a view of where I am up to and the general layout of the garden. You will notice there is almost always a dog or child in the picture. The child is a good little helper, the dog just likes having his photo taken!

    The garden faces pretty much due south. Looking down the garden from the house (very similar to my view from the bath!).

    image

    Back towards the house. You can see the dog guiltily standing on the area of mud that used to be grass. He likes running laps of the garden, using the island bed as a roundabout. Not a good game when we have a winter as wet as we just have. Also the grass there is poor anyway as it was in the shade of the Leylandii and also some of the chippings did not get scraped up properly. I have a plan to build a picket fence around the patio to mainly keep the dog enclosed and then I will have a go at the grass. I am going to give it a chance to sort itself out first and I have half a box of grass seed left that I will spread around once it warms up.

     

    image

     The bed we started last year. This will now be mainly pastel colours; blues, purples, whites etc.

    <img src='/uploads/images/original/41077.JPG
  • Sprig2Sprig2 Posts: 74

    Oops, I think it got sick of me adding so many photos.

    The bed we started last year. This will now be mainly pastel colours; blues, purple,

    image

    Lovely magnolia.

    image

     From next to our lounge patio doors.

    image

     That is it for now. If people are interested I will take more pics when I have done more work or there are decisions to be made.

     

     

  • Busy Bee2Busy Bee2 Posts: 1,005

    This is lovely Sprig.  Those sweeping curving beds really do give a sense of the garden going on for ever, and you look very organised!

  • Ryan LloydRyan Lloyd Posts: 391

    I totally agree with you Busy, Sprig, you're doing a fab job! Can't wait for the next instalment image

  • Forester2Forester2 Posts: 1,477

    That is one classy garden Sprig.  Keep the pictures coming too.

  • Sprig2Sprig2 Posts: 74

    Now is the time to tell you all that I really have no idea what I am doing with gardening so it will probably look hideous when everything grows this year and I find I have put the wrong things in the wrong place. When it does please do tell me and I can move things round again so it looks like a proper garden.

  • Ryan LloydRyan Lloyd Posts: 391

    Well Atleast nobody can knock you for your determination! image At the end of the day though, it's not what we think, the guys on here can advise, but its you that's going to have to work with the garden all year every year. You'll get different tastes for different plants if you havent alread? And your garden will evolve into something amazing image

  • Busy Bee2Busy Bee2 Posts: 1,005

    Well Sprig, I think you are doing very well.  In general I love trees, and hate to see them being cut down, and your garden looked okay before the work if you wanted it to be 'all about the trees'.  But they dominated it, and now you have a completely different style of garden for having got rid of them.  Leylandii are too powerful a statement for a lot of people, even if they are not causing shade problems for neighbours - they are really only suitable for the largest of spaces.  But at the same time you have kept the less invasive and more attractive trees, which for me, give just the right amount of height.  So you have a very good eye for how to use the space.  And I am sure that will mean you get the borders right, even if you do have to move stuff about a bit.  Keep the photos coming!

Sign In or Register to comment.