compost in dustbins and alpaca poo

I have a very small garden, so no space for a proper compost area.  However I put all my vegetable waste and garden cuttings etc into a plastic dustbin, which goes to the local tip every couple of months.  Is there any way I could make compost from this, and if so, how long will t take to process?

 

Also, we have alpacas locally, and I have been told their poo is good for the garden.  Is this right, and if so, what plants would benefit from it?

Posts

  • fidgetbonesfidgetbones Posts: 13,197

    I think that if you have the space for a bin, replace that bin with either a wormery or compost bin, maybe by modifying the bin you have  I have a brown bin that goes to the council for emptying. It gets perennial weeds like docks, bindweed, etc. It has stood all winter because it doesn't get emptied until march.  Yesterday i tipped out of it about a gallon of brown liquid. It had made compost over the winter. You can't stop stuff rotting, just give ita ahelping hand. See Edds vermicomposting thread for ideas.

    You don't stop doing new things because you get old, you get old because you stop doing new things. <3
  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 13,165

    It would also speed up the rotting down if you could saw the bottom off your bin, worms are the best thing for making compost. Our council are selling dalik type bins for 12.00, they dont have bottoms in them so you sit them on bare e

    arth.

    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • Peat BPeat B Posts: 441
    Alpaca Pooh ???? Rama llama ding dong ! I think that virtually ANY stuff from the 'other end' of a herbivore, is beneficial to a garden, as long as it ain't too fresh. Like a good wine, it is best after a period of maturation, processing and then spread the o be joyful. I had a coo many years ago. The stuff I cleaned out of her shed was heaped outside, and after 6 months, it was like cheese, Juicy, firm and smelled like the finest fragrance that Dior could produce
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