getting rid of slugs

Has anyone got any good tips on keeping slugs at bay,without using harsh chemicals.

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Posts

  • Bonnie2Bonnie2 Posts: 6

    You can put a ring of diatomaceous earth around the plants, or crush up eggshells very finely and use that instead. Another way is to sink a tub of beer into the ground, the slugs fall in and die happy. All of these methods are entirely human and animal safe,and they work perfectly. You just have to remember to reapply the earth or eggshells every time it rains.

  • sotongeoffsotongeoff Posts: 9,806

    First have a hunt round the garden for the hiding places-they will hide under anything bits of wood, pots etc.

    Then go out after dark with a torch-you will find them having supper and you can dispose as you wish

    Thirdly slug pellets -if you are against the traditional blue ones there are available a wild-life friendly alternative

  • Alina WAlina W Posts: 1,445

    The midnight hunt is probably the most effective route, backed up by wildlife-safe Growing Success Advanced Slug Pellets.

  • i use every possible method:  the beer one seems to work only once in the season, even when putting fresh beer out.  neither coffee nor eggshells seems to be very effective, but i use them anyway.  copper is supposed to keep slugs away.  a copper band around pots, or edging the vege beds with copper slats.  for me, the most effective killer is the ferrous-based slug pellet, which is not harmful to other birds and beasts.  there is a very good article on slug and snail deterrents on the gardener's world site, so have a look at that.  

  • artychrisartychris Posts: 60

    Thankyou all very much for the many methods, which I will give a try. 

  • ObelixxObelixx Posts: 10,616

    Start with the wildlife friendly slug pellets in late winter/early spring.  Valentine's Day is an easy date to remember.    Scatter pellets thinly near susceptibleplants and in places slugs may hide and repeat regularly as the garden warms up.

    This way you will catch slugs emerging from hibernation before they get the chance to scoff your treasures and breed as well as new slugs emerging from eggs - often the most voracious munchers of new shoots.  

    Then, as mentioned, night time patrols of susceptible plants - hostas, clematis, day lillies, delphiniums, lupins, veggies and so on.

    The Vendée, France
  • SwedboySwedboy Posts: 297

    I found that bitter/ale works much better than lager. Sainsbury's own brand lager the slugs put their nose up at but the bitter went down a storm.

    I've read that putting out the shells of grapefruit is another good way of trapping them and if you are sligtly more sadistic oats apparently makes them swell up and die. Garlic smell is supposed to put them off, not sure if that is because they fear that they are going to be eaten by the French.

  • I find encouraging Thrushes and Blackbirds into the garden does help.  Once they have been attracted by the normal bird feeder approach the slugs are next on the menu! 

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