Mycorrhizal Fungi

I used Mycorrhizal Fungi in all my fruit and veg plants last year and had really noteably bigger crops (especially chillies).  Has anyone else noticed a difference when using this?

Posts

  • Gold1locksGold1locks Posts: 499

    I am surprised at that. The advice from the manufacturer is that it only works when applied directly to the roots of shrubs and trees as they are being planted, and just mixing it into the soil in the planting hole won't work, unlike fertilizers, which must not be applied directly to the roots. 

    I have seen Monty doing it that way recently. He sprinkled it around the edge of the rootball, patting it in by hand. 

  • Gold1locksGold1locks Posts: 499

    On reflection, I may have misunderstood your post. If you are applying the stuff to the roots of soft fruit as you plant them out, or to the roots of chillis, toms etc. as you pot them on, then I reckon that would work. And now I am kicking myself for not doing so on my blackberries and raspberries that I planted a month ago. I have just bought some bush tomato plantlets, and have two more blackberries (Reuben) in pots ready to go out, and I will use teh stuff on them. 

  • figratfigrat Posts: 1,619
    I'm trying it a few woody herbs that I've planted out over the last couple of weeks, their predecessors never really got going. So I will wait and see...
  • When I have been potting on seeedlings I put some in the hole so it is in direct contact with the roots.  I've used it on bonsai trees ever since it came on the market to reduce stresses when repotting and it does seem to make a difference 

  • FloBearFloBear Posts: 2,281

    So is there just one kind of fungus that's supposed to work with any plant? I thought that plants had fungi that were specific to their particular needs.

    Also, would it be really silly to dig up a very recently planted shrub to apply the fungus then plant it again?

    Bear of Very Little Brain

  • BookertooBookertoo Posts: 1,306

    Have just planted a small cherry tree and used it for the first time, the previous tree died so I am hoping this will give the new one a better chance.   

    I imagine if you are keen to use it, and you have really just planted the new shrub, you can do no harm, and maybe alot of good, by gently removing it and adding the fungus then replanting it.  If just done it would not add a deal of extra stress to the plant, and the fungus may do a huge amount of good.   I shall watch the cherry tree with interest. 

  • FloBear wrote (see)

    So is there just one kind of fungus that's supposed to work with any plant? I thought that plants had fungi that were specific to their particular needs.

    Also, would it be really silly to dig up a very recently planted shrub to apply the fungus then plant it again?

    Bear of Very Little Brain

    From what I uderstand the fungi works on just about all trees except that with high acid soil (Azalea etc) and as its a soil based thing rather than a plant one it has the symbiotic relationship with the roots okay.  Probably not a good idea to dig up a healthy tree/plant to add it if its growing okay though

  • neal4neal4 Posts: 19

    I understood you could add it to an already growing tree, and gain benefits in particular if the tree is stressed.  addition via a liquid feed to the feeder roots is recommended.   any experience ?

  • jeninkentjeninkent Posts: 77

    A good article on the RHS site, explains all about Mycorrhizas:

    https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?pid=633

  • Dave MorganDave Morgan Posts: 3,122

    Personally I like it. It certainly makes a difference IMHO .

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