Design student looking for help!

Hi, I'm a design student in the UK and my latest project has led me to design around gardening, specifically the redesign of the watering can. 

I was just wondering if you had any insights as to how you think it could be improved? Currently my idea is to a attach a spray nozzel to the spout so that, with the squeeze of a trigger, a spray of water comes out for watering leaves and more delicate flowers. But being a novice gardener I have no idea as to wether this is helpful to people like you, so I was just hoping for some input.

Thanks,

Caleb

«13

Posts

  • ClaringtonClarington Posts: 4,949

    You mean like this? (Random picture off the internet)

    http://www.thegreenhead.com/imgs/xl/mist-n-pour-two-in-one-watering-can-spray-bottle-xl.jpg

     

  • fidgetbonesfidgetbones Posts: 13,892

    My OH thinks that watering cans should have a little ladder on the inside, so when a mouse drops in, it can climb out and not drown. We've had two drown so far this year. They tend to clog up the spout.

    You don't stop doing new things because you get old, you get old because you stop doing new things. <3
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 58,414

     Caleb - we rarely need to water the leaves or flowers of garden plants - that isn't good for them - it's the soil around the roots that needs the water.  Water on the leaves can cause scorch-marks when the sun shines, and watering the flowers can also damage them.

    What I would find useful is a transparent watering with litres and millilitres etc marked clearly (like my kitchen measuring jug) so that when I'm adding something like soluble potash to the water to be watered into the soil, I can be more accurate if I want to use smaller amounts of water.  

    At the moment my watering cans hold about 2.5 litres of water each (I think) and I have to guess if I'm using small amounts of soluble fertiliser, or mix it in a kitchen measuring jug then tip it into the watering can.

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • ClaringtonClarington Posts: 4,949

    Ooh Dove that would be a good idea. I'm guilty of guessing more than once because I couldn't see the markings. Oil cans (aka motor oil) have a clear section up one side so you can see how many litres you have it would be lovely to have the same on a watering can.

    Fidget - maybe your watering can needs to have a little rubber lid to keep the mice out! (Would perhaps keep my feet dry when I over fill it and enthusiastically tip a little too much resulting in more water of the top than out the spout).

    What I'd like is for them to have a larger bottom so they're more stable. Being a little balance challenged I always end up putting them down on a pebble or muddy patch of earth and having the whole can tipping over.

  • a 6 pint milk carton with a few holes poked in it does the job just fine.... 

  • Clarington wrote (see)

    You mean like this? (Random picture off the internet)

    http://www.thegreenhead.com/imgs/xl/mist-n-pour-two-in-one-watering-can-spray-bottle-xl.jpg

     

    yeah, almost only I was thinking of putting the spray nozzle on the same end of the spout, the positioning of it as it is is just kind of awkward.  

    fidgetbones wrote (see)

    My OH thinks that watering cans should have a little ladder on the inside, so when a mouse drops in, it can climb out and not drown. We've had two drown so far this year. They tend to clog up the spout.

    Thats a good idea! i'll have to think about it some more! maybe a textured surface on the inside so that they can grip the walls to get out easier?

     Dovefromabove wrote (see)

     Caleb - we rarely need to water the leaves or flowers of garden plants - that isn't good for them - it's the soil around the roots that needs the water.  Water on the leaves can cause scorch-marks when the sun shines, and watering the flowers can also damage them.

    What I would find useful is a transparent watering with litres and millilitres etc marked clearly (like my kitchen measuring jug) so that when I'm adding something like soluble potash to the water to be watered into the soil, I can be more accurate if I want to use smaller amounts of water.  

    At the moment my watering cans hold about 2.5 litres of water each (I think) and I have to guess if I'm using small amounts of soluble fertiliser, or mix it in a kitchen measuring jug then tip it into the watering can.

    Thanks so much for your input! It's great to get feedback from someone who knows what they're talking about. Do you know if there is any need for them when growing vegetables then? 

    That makes a lot of sense, Ill try and do a guick sketch and post it in a little while to see if we are on the same page. 

    Thanks again everyone for your replies

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 58,414

    Water on the leaves of any plant, flower or vegetable, provides ideal conditions for fungal infections causing rot etc - watering should be kept to the soil only in almost all cases. 

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • WelshonionWelshonion Posts: 3,114

    Dove, do tell Mother Nature that.  In my garden it rains on the leaves of the  plants, and they don't all keel over with fungal diseases.  In fact, none of them do.

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 58,414

    I know Welshonion - annoying how she gets away with it isn't it image  but then when Mother Nature does her watering she tends to do it in when the temperatures are lower and not so conducive to fungal growth, and she also tends to give them more than just a sprinkling, so fungal spores usually get washed off the leaves.  

    We gardeners tend to do our watering when the soil is dry and usually that means the temperatures are warm and just right for fungal spores to develop in the bit of water that we sprinkle around - so I maintain - much better for us to water the ground and not the leaves. image

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • ClaringtonClarington Posts: 4,949

    I can't help but think a spray nozzle on the end you're trying to poke close to the soil is just going to get caught up on all the leafs and branches. A long fine spout to aid your point and aim abilities is quite useful when you've several plants together. 

    I wonder if you can get watering cans with a flexible spout? That way you can get the water just where you want it without struggling to hold the can at a funny angle (no good if you've a full can / poor grip).

Sign In or Register to comment.