Snowdrop bulbs

does anyone know of anywhere that I can buy SNOWDROP plants or bulbs ?

«13

Posts

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 43,759

    You'll find them on sale around March time after they've finished flowering - they don't grow well as dried bulbs so the usual practice is to buy them 'in the green'.  

    There'll be loads of sellers in the small ads in the back of Gardeners World magazine.  

    Just make sure you buy guaranteed English grown ones as some unscrupulous people dig up wild ones abroad and sell them.  

    Lots of different varieties available so now is the time of year to do some googling to see which ones you want to buy. image

    You might find some in little pots in garden centres in January, but it's an expensive way to buy them.

    No-one knows if you've done your housework, but everyone knows if you've done your gardening !
  • fidgetbonesfidgetbones Posts: 11,257

    There are some bulbs half price in the garden centres now, but they are dried out and probably won't do very well.

    It's not a mess, it's a nature reserve.
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 43,759

    My snowdrops are peeking through the soil already image

    No-one knows if you've done your housework, but everyone knows if you've done your gardening !
  • Have a go I purchased x6 packs from my local garden centre last week. However I also bought a load in the green last year ( for those of you who know me yes from ebay) and they are peeking through again nicely!

  • BobTheGardenerBobTheGardener LeicsPosts: 6,499

    In the case of snowdrop bulbs I think it must depend on how long they are out of the ground.  Some years ago I dug up a very dry clump (the bulbs had no roots or shoots showing) in late summer and immediately replanted handfuls of them in other areas of the garden.  They all flowered the next spring, so I expect the bad reputation comes from buying loose bulbs which have been in storage for some weeks or months.

    A trowel in the hand is worth a thousand lost under a bush.
  • fidgetbonesfidgetbones Posts: 11,257

    Bob, thats what I usually do. Every year I can guarantee I will stick a fork through a clump after it has died down. I shove a few back in that spot, and spread the others around the garden, just pushing them into empty spots. I don't let them dry out. From a few dozen that were here when I came, I've now got thousands.

    It's not a mess, it's a nature reserve.
  • nutcutletnutcutlet Posts: 24,250

    A galanthophile told me that summer is good for moving them. But keeping them out of the ground is never good

  • So best to google to find suppliers then folks.

    we seem to be going off on a different tangent image

  • fidgetbonesfidgetbones Posts: 11,257

     Nick, Do you want them to flower spring 2014 or is this a long term project? How many do you want? How big an area do you want to cover?

    It's not a mess, it's a nature reserve.
  • nutcutletnutcutlet Posts: 24,250

    Yes, it's your choice which company you get them from Nick. Come February time there'll be plenty of choice. 

    I love a good tangentimage

    Unless you have lots of money and a collecting nature you should avoid all those named varieties that appear on ebay for lots of money. For a good patch of white you want single snowdrops, Galanthus nivalis. They seed and make new buls. The bulbs multiply as well and you can split them up and a new clump will form.

    They come in doubles as well, that's Galanthus nivali which are quite pretty, clump up well but don't set seed and are probably no good for any early bees

    I can't remember where mine came from.

    google 'snowdrops in the green' 

     

«13
Sign In or Register to comment.