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Get thrifty

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  • happymarionhappymarion Posts: 4,591

    Done! Go to Forum-Garden Design- redesign of Garden by Kate Bradbury.

  • If your shoe lace breaks keep the longer part of it and use it on your vegetable patch to tie your bean wigwam frame together! Can't get much more thrifty really!!!
  • Eddie JEddie J Posts: 108

    We have a whole garden full of free or easily obtainable throw away items, or items that are constructed to a very tight budget. Here is just a small selection.

    Free plant support.

    http://img88.imageshack.us/img88/7268/dscf1722t.jpg

    http://img534.imageshack.us/img534/4905/dscf1723y.jpg

    Free storage using the front of a luton body.

    http://img69.imageshack.us/img69/7117/dscf0330p.jpg

    Free garden table/bench made from scrap oak with a douglas top.

    http://img510.imageshack.us/img510/3421/dscf0900.jpg


     

    http://img651.imageshack.us/img651/7924/dscf0963i.jpg

    I made another one last week from yet more scrap oak.

    http://img217.imageshack.us/img217/2672/dscf2576n.jpg

    Fold out and put away bean supports. These cost about £5.00 to make, but can be used over and over again

    http://img186.imageshack.us/img186/6233/dscf9885g.jpg

    http://img543.imageshack.us/img543/1804/dscf9887.jpg

    Free fire pit made from a washing machine drum, and a free BBQ made from an childrens swing and a metal shelf.

    http://img16.imageshack.us/img16/4717/dscf2355i.jpg

    http://img27.imageshack.us/img27/2893/fire1z.jpg

    A free simple garden pot stand/bench made from more scrap oak.

    http://img7.imageshack.us/img7/9912/dscf1147z.jpg

    Free bird table made from part of a felled oak tree.

    http://img821.imageshack.us/img821/9191/dscf9264x.jpg

    A very heavy duty gadern shed which cost about £70.00 to construct. The £70.00 was cost for the cost of the materials to carry out the concrete base. Everything else came pretty much from skip diving.

    http://img96.imageshack.us/img96/581/dscf0387ga.jpg

    A free nest box.

     
    http://img189.imageshack.us/img189/4307/p1100549j.jpg

    A free oak garden bench, made from scrap oak. We have three of these.

    http://img573.imageshack.us/img573/8926/p1080303s.jpg

       Victorian path edgings used to make bordered beds.. More skip diving!

    http://img692.imageshack.us/img692/2926/rszdscf0329.jpg

















     

  • I use the toilet roll inners to start my carrots , parsnips and leeks,most of the people on my allotment site had trouble growing ( or not growing as it turned out these, partly because the soil is only about 4inches ( ok,10cms) deep in places, but last year I managed a crop of carrots on a raised bed, starting them in the greenhouse at home, in the inner rolls, then thinning out there and transplanting the lot, straight into the prepared raised bed. this year I'm trying the parnsips and leeks the same way, well almost, i am planning to only half fill the ones for the leeks, then top them upo as they grow, ever the optimist !!!

  • Eddie JEddie J Posts: 108
    HopefulJack wrote (see)

    I use the toilet roll inners to start my carrots , parsnips and leeks,most of the people on my allotment site had trouble growing ( or not growing as it turned out these, partly because the soil is only about 4inches ( ok,10cms) deep in places, but last year I managed a crop of carrots on a raised bed, starting them in the greenhouse at home, in the inner rolls, then thinning out there and transplanting the lot, straight into the prepared raised bed. this year I'm trying the parnsips and leeks the same way, well almost, i am planning to only half fill the ones for the leeks, then top them up as they grow, ever the optimist !!!

    Thanks for that tip, I'll try that this year.image
  • RonRon Posts: 32

    To prevent eye damage from garden canes, make a hole in the end of a wine bottle cork, you may need to drink more wine but hey !

  • My mother saves old, laddered tights for us to use in our garden. We cut them into strips to secure blackberry plants and other whippy growth on both climbing and shrubby plants, use 'whole legs', doubled up to secure young trees to their stakes (in a figure of 8 around tree and stake to create a central buffer so that the tree doesn't rub on the stake) and even cut into thin ribbons to secure plant labels to trees and shrubs. Floppy herbaceous plants can be suported using deep ring sections of 'leg' encircling 3 or 4 stakes, which the plant then obscures with growth.

    They don't rot and fall off like jute string, come in different colours so they can be chosen to blend with the plant being secured, and are strong yet soft and stretchy, so don't damage the plant. if you need an extra strong tie, use the waist band rib,  which is a heavier denier than the leg bits.

    We stretch the foot end of a pair of tights over a small plant pot which has the base cut out, and nestle this into the hole in the  top of the each water butt, so that debris from the gutters is trapped in the foot of the tights therefore keeping the water clean. These can be periodically emptied onto the composter, or if really slimey, we just chuck the whole tights foot into the bin and replace with a fresh foot!

     Tights can be packed with nettles, dandelion heads,comfrey or horse manure ( it's amazing how much they stretch) and then suspended in a bucket of water to make a compost 'tea'.

    You can also use an old pair to strain compost tea through, so you don't clog the nozzle of your watering can.

    They can also be used to store onions, hanging up on a beam in the garage, to store loose bundles of seed heads in an airy shed, and to dry nettle leaves which are then chopped and fed to our hens.

    They are great for cleaning gutters or plastic plant pots out if you use a whole pair, rolled into a ball. No need to wash out afterwards: just throw away. 

    Use a whole pair, balled up to clean garden tools, and another pair to dipped in oil to wipe the metal parts down to prevent rusting.

    You can use them to bundle up hose pipe, netting, and lengths of of garden fleece to hang on a hook when not in use. They are stretchy enough to be able to get some tension on the fastening, without having to tie them so tight you can't then undo the knot in the spring.

    Sometimes it feels a bit wasteful to use them in this way, but they would otherwise gone straight to landfill, and it saves me buying or using something else for the same job.

  • To protect your plants from slugs when first growing cut the bottom off a large Squash bottle take the lid off the top and place over the plant also if your needing to protect a new small plant until established then cut a bottle to size taking the base and top off place over the plant,you can water the plant and protect from damage!image

  • JufiJufi Posts: 1

    Love what Eddie J has done, just wish I knew where to get scrap Oak.  I use lengths of guttering cut to the same size as the width of my raised beds, to start my veg early in my greenhouse.Removes the need to thin, and the planting out, as the whole lot just slides onto the raised bed. Baskets from my old freezer now protect my crops from pigeons helping themselves. Bits of carpet, make great liners for baskets, instead of the moss which the birds usually pinch for their nests.  

  • happymarion wrote (see)

    My friends save their sticks from their ice-creams at the amateur theatre we frequent automaticaly now, for me to take home and wash to make plant labels.

    One of my work colleagues partakes in Tesco sushi at lunchtime and saves the chopsticks for me for plant labels.

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