Pulmonaria obscura seeds

Jim MacdJim Macd Posts: 751

Does anyone have seeds / plants of Pulmonaria obscura or know of a source. B&T world seeds list it but they don't have stock, however I would prefer to find a British source if possible rather than European.

Thanks in advance.

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  • nutcutletnutcutlet Posts: 24,231

    I've never seen that one Jim

  • Jim MacdJim Macd Posts: 751

    I suppose it's specific name is more apt that I'd hoped. image it's common name is Suffolk Lungwort. So fingers crossed it may be a little less obscure there image and with even more luck someone will have some seed or plants. I can't believe such a beautiful, small,woodland plant is so hard to get hold of. The two main suppliers I normally use don't do either native species, one of them does P. officinalis which is introduced. No wonder it's rare if nobody sells it. image

  • nutcutletnutcutlet Posts: 24,231

    If you do find any for sale let me knowimage 

    I'm much closer to Suffolk than you and I don't know this one at all

  • It's extremely rare (Red Data Book) so I'm not surprised seeds are not available. Is the rarity the reason you want to grow it, Jim? The only real difference from P.officinalis is in the unspotted leaves, and the leaves are usually the main attraction (at least in my opinion!).

  • nutcutletnutcutlet Posts: 24,231

    I like to have the natives landgirl. Common sense tells me that anything that eats P. obscura can cope with P. officinalis. If it can't it's likely to be extinct already. 

    But I love my native flowers

  • Jim MacdJim Macd Posts: 751

    It is listed on the Red List as having only 600 individuals over just 3 locations so it's not surprising you don't know it. I find it really frustrating when things are so rare that more isn't done to ensure their survival and surely you couldn't do more than make plants available through micropropagation or just cuttings. It will become less rare if people like us are happy to take on custodianship of some plants. Okay they won't be 'wild' anymore but at least they'll have less chance of going extinct, and better that than have non-native plants being imported.

  • Jim MacdJim Macd Posts: 751

    Thanks for the links by the way, I did know about that, I found a later mention of a visit. 

  • nutcutletnutcutlet Posts: 24,231

    There isn't any 'wild' left round here. Agricultural desert land and gravel pits.

    I like to think if I keep the wild plants here I can re-populate after the gravel extraction is over. In theory after the latest extraction is finished there'll be a wildlife area right on my boundary. I hope I live long enough to see it happen 

  • Jim MacdJim Macd Posts: 751
    landgirl100 wrote (see)

    It's extremely rare (Red Data Book) so I'm not surprised seeds are not available. Is the rarity the reason you want to grow it, Jim? The only real difference from P.officinalis is in the unspotted leaves, and the leaves are usually the main attraction (at least in my opinion!).

    No, not at all, I'd still want it if it were as common as a daisy, I'd just not have to be looking for it. image but P. officinalis and spotless forms. I have it, it gets huge. I'll see if I can find a photo I took. 

     

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