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Myrtle

Can anyone tell me why the leaves on my myrtle bush (it is about 18mths old) growing in a large pot have started to get something like black spot and are dropping off.  It has been growing very well, although it didn't have any flowers and consequently no berries on it this year.  Don't want to loose it so any help would be appreciated.

Thanks

Posts

  • I have just notice that my potted myrtle has widespread black/purple blotches with ochre spots appearing within the purple areas. Is it disease of mistreatment?

  • How do I overwinter my Myrtle tree
  • How do I overwinter my Myrtle tree

    I have Myrtle growing here that has done fine outside growing in the ground with no special treatment. Why do you think yours needs some particular overwinter technique?
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 9,088
    edited September 2021
    I also have a myrtle growing outside for about 15 years.
    It did get quite a lot of damage from the severe frosts earlier this year, but it's fine now and flowered well this year

    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 47,198
    You'd need to offer a lot more info @peterscarpetcare.
    Location, climate, maturity of plant etc.
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Hi fairygirl ,, the plant was bought this year ,, it’s about a foot tall ,, based in Lincoln , in a pot 
  • Hi rob , this is my second Myrtle, the first just died and I’m worried that winter may kill this plant . I can move it into the greenhouse 
  • Hi rob , this is my second Myrtle, the first just died and I’m worried that winter may kill this plant . I can move it into the greenhouse 

    If it is in a pot and you have the space in the greenhouse then moving it into the greenhouse for the winter sounds like a good idea. Lincoln would probably be a bit colder than here over winter. Some plants are more tender when they are younger and being in the ground does offer the roots a bit more protection than a pot out doors where the cold air can get at the roots more easily. If you are happy to keep it at a smaller size in a pot you could move it into the greenhouse each winter and gradually bring it out again in the following spring with maybe taking it back in again overnight if there is a late frost forecast. Just saw a really old one out doors in a sheltered garden near here yesterday and it had a few trunks of about a foot thickness and a height higher than I could see due the the rain shelter where I was sitting but here was no way this myrtle would be moving anywhere and I guess it must have been growing there for a number of decades.
    Happy gardening!
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 47,198
    I'd say err on the side of caution with it too  :)
    They aren't the most reliably hardy plants in the world, and although it might be fine in future, once it's more established and mature, any young plant can be vulnerable in cold conditions. The odd cold spell can be fine, but it's when you get a long, cold spell that problems are greater.
    They don't like the kind of conditions I have here. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • I had two in pots for ages that developed black spots. Planted them in ground and they have recovered really well. 
    Doesn't help you much if you don't have the space. Would reporting help to get some more nutrients into the plant?

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