Quick screening fix needed

A large tree collapsed in the summer leaving a gap at the back of the garden. I think the remaining part of the tree will need cutting down, at least the right side trunk. 

Any ideas what can go in its place to screen from the houses beyond ?

And how long before it reached above the fence which is about 5 1/2 ft including bottom panels.

Or any ideas if I could build a raised planter along the top of the fence ( would need to be fairly cheap and easy).

Reasonable soil, south facing.

Thank you.

image

 

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Posts

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 43,806

    Does the tree trunk really have to come down - could it be stabilised? I ask this because I think the quickest way to effectively recreate a screen will be to plant either a vigorous rambling rose such as Rambling Rector, or a clematis montana, so that they scramble up and fill the gap as in these pics 

    image

     Rambling Rector in an old tree

    image

     Clematis montana rubra in a dead tree.

    No-one knows if you've done your housework, but everyone knows if you've done your gardening !
  • MrsGardenMrsGarden Posts: 3,736

    Hi dove, that was my original and preferred idea but I'm not sure the right side will remain stable long term, the bark is still falling off, it seems diseased and there's a lot of water trapping in the fork of the trunks.I particularly like your pics where there is still space at the bottom. If the tree fell further or we decided to cut it at a later date, would that fit in with pruning the climbers once established?

  • ObelixxObelixx Posts: 10,677

    I would suggest removing as much of the trunk aspossible, especially if it is diseased orrotten.

    I would then consider somethink like a liquidambar which will grow tall but not have too wide a spread at the base and will give fabulous foliage colours in spring and autumns and good leaf form in between.   As it matures, you can raise the canopy by removing lower branches if you want to plant beneath it.

    Rambling Rector is good but can only ramble high if he has supports.  Otherwise he will swamp neighbouring plants as he's very vigorous.

    The Vendée, France
  • MrsGardenMrsGarden Posts: 3,736

    Thanks obelisk, that looks a nice tree. Crocus have them at £39.99 for about 5ft, just unsure it will put on the extra height quickly enough, may look around and/or consider other options. 

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 43,806

    No need to prune Rambling Rector other than to hack it back when it outgrows its allotted space.  The perfume is fantastic!!!

    You could put in a timber support to prop the dodgy side of the tree - it would soon blend in once the planting got going.

    No-one knows if you've done your housework, but everyone knows if you've done your gardening !
  • ObelixxObelixx Posts: 10,677

    beware Mrs G.  Any tree that puts on rapid growth is likley to turn out to be a monster so go for beauty and a bit of patience instead.   Your local GC or nusery might have a liquidambar at a competitive price.   They soon grow if given the right conditions at planting time - http://apps.rhs.org.uk/advicesearch/Profile.aspx?PID=237

     

    The Vendée, France
  • Jim MacdJim Macd Posts: 751

    I have a Rambling Rector (glad I'm not on my predictive text computer there) and I can confirm that it will grow 3 M a year from a six inch bare rooter. I bought mine to cover a large scar in an old conifer when the one next to it was cut down. It flowered in the first year and each year since with nice hips and a very nice scent. I've also grown a clematis through it for extra interest and if that wasn't enough a second rose which has hardly grown at all.

  • MrsGardenMrsGarden Posts: 3,736

    I'll have to get someone to quote (will ask neighbours who they have used), for removing the tree, which I think long term will be needed, but I am tempted to go for the RR (avoiding predictive!) in the meantime. I think I have enough space, but it looks to grow huge - would I be able to keep it less bushy towards the bottom? If the tree is diseased is it likely to affect the RR or other plants? At the moment the neighbours over that part of the fence wouldn't even notice it, but future neighbours may get upset if it encroaches on their side too much - how prickly is it for pruning with regard to reaching over the fence to keep their side in check? Just so you know, it would be my first ever rose I have bought! ( got a small multi-coloured one that I inherited with the house but that's all).

    When it comes to removing it (hopefully before nature takes it's course), then I'll think about replacing the tree, maybe with the liquidambar as suggested, I should have enough space to dig a big enough a hole to the right. Looking at the garden as a whole a replacement tree would be the right framework/backdrop to fit in.

  • MrsGardenMrsGarden Posts: 3,736

    oooo just seen this....Liquidambar styraciflua 'Slender Silhouette'....

  • ObelixxObelixx Posts: 10,677

    Rambling Rector is rampant and thorny but not as thorny as Kiftsgate.  I think you should do a bit of research on rose selling sites such as David Austin, Peter beales and Harkness.  You can also ask for advice from them.  I have done this with David Austin in the past.

    I'd still go for the liquidambar but would get the old stump removed first.   Save an RR for another situation where he can have free rein over a pergola or trellis or even a wall.  

    Friends of mine had one trained to cover a 2 storey house wall and it also grew over a pergola which was 10' high, 12 feet wide and 2 car lengths deep over the entry to their garden.   Like I said, it gets huge and needs a lot of training and support if you don't have a handy conifer or large tree to hold it up.

    The Vendée, France
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