Welcome to the garden design forum

Daniel HaynesDaniel Haynes Posts: 379 admin

If you’re keen to know the whys and wherefores of garden design, enter this forum. Suggest planting combinations, talk about the latest trends and recommend inspiring gardens to visit.

Daniel Haynes

Editor, gardenersworld.com

«13456710

Posts

  • happymarionhappymarion Posts: 4,591

    If you would like to see a garden that contrasts the English country garden in rooms style with the modern, visit Kiftsgate Manor Gardens where one of the rooms in the top garden has been re-designed in ultra-modern style.  No perennial borders in this one. I wil try to put its photo on. It does not seem to be uploading yet.

  • Daniel HaynesDaniel Haynes Posts: 379 admin

    Hello happymarion, it's lovely to see you on the forum. I'm ashamed to confess I've never been to Kiftsgate - I must go. I'm sorry you've had trouble uploading your image. Could you try again over the weekend, and let us know how you get on? If you have any further difficulty our tech team will sort it out for you.

  • happymarionhappymarion Posts: 4,591

    Trying again to upload a photo.  Too many bytes so will try again.

    image

     Success!!!  It appears one has to keep the image below 10 megabytes.  Anyway I am sure you can see enough of this garden to realise the pleasure comes from sitting in its cool green setting looking at the calm water and watching the sporadic little row of fountains. I took the photo from the bench seat at one end of the pool.

  • Daniel HaynesDaniel Haynes Posts: 379 admin

    Ah, victory! Thanks for persevering. That is about as angular and formal a design as you could have, isn't it? Very striking...

  • Hello Happymarion,

    That's a lovely photo. It gives me the opportunity to talk about the benefits of conifers in gardens. So many people don't like them. But where would your Kiftsgate pool be without the magnificently cut yew hedges around it? I love conifers. Does anybody else have a good photo / story about gardening with conifers?

    Emma

    The Gardeners' World web team

  • happymarionhappymarion Posts: 4,591

    You don't have to convert a Scots lady to the benefit of conifers.  I love my Scots pine the birds or squirrels brought me in the front garden and they go so well with heathers.  I still have Adrian Bloom's book - they were all the rage in island beds in the 70's so are "retro" now, but then I still go shopping with my retro woven plastic shopping bag and it gets greatly admired!  Part of the charm of the Bristol botanic garden are the lovely yew hedges which were in the old house garden (late19thC) when the Garden moved there in 2005.  One long one will be the backdrop to the new native meadow.  As you say Emma a yew hedge is a great backdrop.

  • Hello Happymarion,

    I'm so glad you allowed your scots pine seedling to grow. A mature scots pine with its red bark is a very beautiful thing. Pine forests are very important for the beleaguered red squirrel too.

    Emma.

    gardenersworld.com team

  • happymarionhappymarion Posts: 4,591

    So does the design team have any ideas for my new veg..garden  - potager style - on the site of the old one which I have been digging and manuring for 47 years?  I have been religiously saving for its construction since last April.  It sits almost dead in the middle of my very long garden and is oblong in shape.  At my age I have decided to become No-Dig so raised beds are the order of the day and somewhere to sit and put my tools and drink flask are mandetory.  One thing is very important - the reputation my garden has for exceptional ptoductivity must not be jeopardised and good wildlife must be encouraged.  i will try to find

    image

    a photo that shows where the veg, patch is in relation to the rest of the garden.

  • happymarionhappymarion Posts: 4,591

    The early potatoes and onions shown here are in an oblong which is a tenth of the breadth of the veg. patch and a twentieth of the length.

  • Emma and happymarion2. I have half an acre at the back of my house on Skye. I'm looking to create something interesting but not too structured that will create shelter for my raised beds, other than the fences i have built this year. The ground has marsh grasses, it's on a peninsula into a sea loch, and although not boggy it holds the heavy rain we've had for the last 2 months and is exposed to the prevailing winds.  I have half thought about various types of hedge and after reading your comments I'm wondering about yew hedges. Being a novice with little experience and trying to learn everything at once I don't know how hardy and how fast growing they are. Do you think they are a possibility? Any other suggestions would be gratefully received.

Sign In or Register to comment.