Garlic planting

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  • I didn't know you could plant Super Market Cloves (Thought they had been treated so they wouldn't produce)

     

    I'm going to have a go the same 1/2 Supermarket 1/2 shop

  • I got fully segmented garlic bulbs from every supermarket clove that I planted last year. I used my own compost with vermiculite so the resulting bulbs cost next to nothing. I planted them all individually into 9" pots. This year I have also planted up pairs of cloves in 12" pots and they are all sprouting. The only thing I've heard about planting supermarket cloves is that they may have no disease resistance but that's not been my experience so far.

    Most of the resulting bulbs were about 3 cms in diameter, a bit more difficult to peel than shop bought garlic, but we used the lot over a period of about 3 months and they tasted delicious!

    I'm not convinced that I will achieve bigger bulbs from the bought in garlic but we'll see.

  • ClaringtonClarington Posts: 4,949

    I've got some Marco garlic I planted in early October that is going all guns blazing (still finding it a little odd to have plants growing at a time I normally consider to be hibernating) and I've a few bulbs / cloves left over that I couldn't get into mud owing to the house move / lack of available pots.

    Is it too late to get them into the ground now? (Could I for instance keep them in the unheated greenhouse to give them some protection from the elements until they're established and then plant them outside?) Or could I plant them out in spring i.e. February / March to catch the last of the frosts (considering we were still getting snow this year in May) but miss the worst of the weather?

  • I think at this stage you should plant the cloves in cell trays then plant them out in Spring once they have produced shoots. You'd still have to keep them outside however, but in a sheltered spot, because as you rightly point out they need a period of cold to grow successfully (maybe a cold frame or unheated greenhouse?)

    I have never planted garlic later than October and other more experienced growers may have different ideas to help you.

  • ClaringtonClarington Posts: 4,949

    Thanks Lancashire Lass. I was thinking it might be worth giving it a shot now and again in Spring (unless someone said it was a complete waste of time) because I don't know how the bulbs would keep for a year (how are you meant to store garlic for planting?) So I might as well try as throw them into the compost bin in June when they've gone a little funky.

     

  • artjakartjak Posts: 4,167

    My neighbour swears by planting garlic on the shortist day and harvesting on the longest. I prefer to get them in by late October. I am puzzled that every year there are a few thet don't split into cloves, it can't be lack of cold weather because all the others have managed to split. Am a big fan of elephant garlic, it does well here. I then pickle some of the garlic. If anyone is interested I could dig out the recipe.image

  • Clarington wrote (see)

    Thanks Lancashire Lass. I was thinking it might be worth giving it a shot now and again in Spring (unless someone said it was a complete waste of time) because I don't know how the bulbs would keep for a year (how are you meant to store garlic for planting?) So I might as well try as throw them into the compost bin in June when they've gone a little funky.

     

    I think you are supposed to plant the cloves as fresh as possible so I wouldn't leave any until Spring (if I have understood your posting correctly?). They all need to be planted ASAP and if you want to try planting in Spring as well (assuming you intend to plant before the frosts have all gone), then you should buy fresh bulbs at that point.

    I'm not sure if the suppliers continue to sell through until Spring as I have never bought any at that time of year - maybe someone else can help on that.

  • ClaringtonClarington Posts: 4,949

    Thank you Lancashire Lass that's very helpful. I wish they'd taught us stuff like this at school! Its so much more use than knowing the social implications over whether the Nazi party was so successful in its formative years because of the support it got off the Church ideals of the time and how this affects us today and how Romeo and Juliet can (if you twist it enough) reflect on the morals of society today!

  • artjakartjak Posts: 4,167

    Clarington, I so agree; I would happily forgo any knowledge of the Repeal of the Corn Laws for more knowledge about gardening.

  • Hi everybody, its the one thing I just cant grow.   Tried everything in the books etc and they just dont happen.   I bought some giant bulbs from the IOW which you all know is the major grower in the UK and i might just as well bought some from the supermarket and planted them.

    Im doing something wrong as youve already guessed.

     

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