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Question about tulips in pots

AnniDAnniD Posts: 12,468
I have several large pots of tulip bulbs in my greenhouse, kept in there to avoid the attentions of the local squirrel (just as well, as l have seen him burying the neighbour's tulip bulbs in my garden and then retrieving them several days later).

They are now showing shoots around one to two inches high, and l was wondering if it was now safe to move them out into the garden ? 

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  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Posts: 87,903
    When I shared a garden with squirrels I made a ‘deterrent’ for pots of bulbs out of wire netting (a bit like a shower cap but tied under the pot with string. It wouldn’t stop a really determined hungry squirrel but did seem to protect mine … the tulips grow through the netting and the leaves hide it by the time they’re blooming. 

    Gardening in Central Norfolk on improved gritty moraine over chalk ... free-draining.





  • AnniDAnniD Posts: 12,468
    Did you ever see squirrels trying to get through the mesh @Dovefromabove ?

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Posts: 87,903
    No I didn’t … but I did keep them pretty near the office window where few squirrels ventured. 

    When planting crocuses in the soil we made ‘bags’ of wire netting and put bulbs inside them and planted the ‘bags’ … that seemed to work pretty well too. 

    Gardening in Central Norfolk on improved gritty moraine over chalk ... free-draining.





  • Lizzie27Lizzie27 Posts: 12,410
    Now, that's a brilliant idea @Dovefromabove to try with my crocuses next year so thanks for that tip.
    North East Somerset - Clay soil over limestone
  • FireFire Posts: 18,975
    @Dovefromabove can I ask what kind of wire netting you use to make the bags?
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Posts: 87,903
    It was thus sort of stuff … 
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/MARKSMAN-Galvanised-HEXAGONAL-Quality-Chicken/dp/B09J9BFFZ3/ref=mp_s_a_1_7?keywords=rabbit+hutch+wire+mesh&qid=1707602295&sr=8-7

    There were rolls of it on the farm used for all sorts of things. Pa would keep it and reuse it over and over again … most farmers did the same. Most country auctions of farm equipment etc will have a roll or two of used chicken or rabbit wire in the miscellaneous Lots. 

    Odd bits of pre-used netting are ideal for bulb bags, but new stuff will do the job too of course. 

    Gardening in Central Norfolk on improved gritty moraine over chalk ... free-draining.





  • FireFire Posts: 18,975
    edited 10 February
    Last year I did find this stuff - open weave, soft copper mesh. I think the roots  would grow through it - and fine shoots. Maybe not a tulip stem if too thick. You can probably get different grades of soft mesh. It could be very useful stuff. It could be good for a small number of bulb bags.


  • FireFire Posts: 18,975
    AnniD said:
    They are now showing shoots around one to two inches high, and l was wondering if it was now safe to move them out into the garden ? 


    My feeling would to wait until they have buds, to be on the safe side.

    My snowdrops are out and my mini daffs are just starting and it's so frustrating to see slugs eating off the heads before they have barely started. :s
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Posts: 87,903
    edited 11 February
    Fire said:
    Last year I did find this stuff - open weave, soft copper mesh. I think the roots  would grow through it - and fine shoots. Maybe not a tulip stem if too thick. You can probably get different grades of soft mesh. It could be very useful stuff. It could be good for a small number of bulb bags.


    I wouldn’t try that … the holes look much too small IMO. 

    Gardening in Central Norfolk on improved gritty moraine over chalk ... free-draining.





  • The squirrels here never seem interested in bulbs. I occasionally find nuts buried in my tulip pots but no tulips taken ( fingers crossed that this isn’t a “famous last words” moment).

    I wonder if it’s about the range/quantity of food sources locally or simply preferences, learnt behaviour ? 
     If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.”—Marcus Tullius Cicero
    East facing, top of a hill clay-loam, cultivated for centuries (7 years by me). Birmingham
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