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Edging a border Conundrum

Ivy2Ivy2 Posts: 73
I extended my border recently.




Waiting for some of the plants to get established and fill the space (got some more ordered too). I am debating whether to define the border with some blocks/bricks. I was contemplating a DIY effort. 

This No Dig Border video looks very doable:

https://youtu.be/sZc4Q2J4dQ4

Basically it is just laying a foot wide strip if cement mix along front of border, sitting the blocks in top and spraying with water to set the concrete.

Do you think it would look good in my case? Would it look better if I dug a trench first to have the blocks flush with the grass? What type of blocks would you recommend? I am quite keen to suppress weed/lawn spreading into the border so this plan would hopefully help with that. A whole brick length seems a bit too much if I placed them perpendicular to the border but I guess that would be a really effective barrier. 

Finally, it is a curved border, How to manage especially the right hand side mini border which has really tight curves. Am I going to have to hire an angle grinder and start cutting bricks to shape?

Any ideas welcome, indeed is it worth doing at all, would it look better and what colour/type if brick? But any other input valuable.

Posts

  • Lizzie27Lizzie27 Posts: 12,419
    @Ivy2, I agree that it looks very neat and tidy. The main problem I can foresee is that you will not be able to cut the grass neatly around the edge with a lawnmower and will have to manually trim it every time, so at least once a week.

    There isn't an easy answer I find because even on a paved path adjacent and slightly lower to the lawn, the edges still need neatening. I use a long handled lawn edger to do this.
    North East Somerset - Clay soil over limestone
  • Ivy2Ivy2 Posts: 73
    Yes. I have to strim it once a week ideally which I don't mind but the clippings go onto the border and some will probably take root.
  • LoxleyLoxley Posts: 5,690
    Personally I think it looks naff. You could lay it flush but bricks (laid end to end) would do just as well and probably cheaper (often available for free if one of your neighbour's is having building work done). For the tight curves break the bricks in half.
    "What is hateful to you, do not do to your neighbour". 
  • LoxleyLoxley Posts: 5,690
    ... To be fair you will have to do some trimming of the edges whatever you do, so maybe you're best off staying with a soft edge to the lawn.
    "What is hateful to you, do not do to your neighbour". 
  • KT53KT53 Posts: 8,964
    Ivy2 said:
    Yes. I have to strim it once a week ideally which I don't mind but the clippings go onto the border and some will probably take root.

    Grass clippings won't root.
  • Ivy2Ivy2 Posts: 73
    KT53 said:
    Ivy2 said:
    Yes. I have to strim it once a week ideally which I don't mind but the clippings go onto the border and some will probably take root.

    Grass clippings won't root.
    Good to hear. I keep reading mixed answers on this 
  • zugeniezugenie Posts: 834
    If you don’t mind spending a little bit of money, everedge is very good and easy to install (though I haven’t done it on a curve so not sure how much faff that would add!!)
  • Butterfly66Butterfly66 Posts: 964
    Grass clippings don’t root. I suspect the myth is because, if left in place, they help hide the fact that the grass is gradually spreading into the border. That’s certainly what happens here
     If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.”—Marcus Tullius Cicero
    East facing, top of a hill clay-loam, cultivated for centuries (7 years by me). Birmingham
  • Lizzie27Lizzie27 Posts: 12,419
    @zugenie, Everedge is bendable so curves are a doddle!
    North East Somerset - Clay soil over limestone
  • We've used smartedge and it's great for curves. Can mow over it easily.
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