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Help with wall

Does anyone know what I can do to this without having to get someone in and having the wall rebuilt. A temp fix I know at most but what can I do?! Just make it look tidy. 
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  • PlantmindedPlantminded Posts: 3,491
    edited April 2023
    If your DIY skills are anything like mine, I wouldn’t attempt it!  There looks like a bank of earth behind the wall which will probably breach any temporary fix after a bit of rainfall.  If this is an access point used by others, you really need to make it safe.  As a very short term measure you could tape some weed suppressing membrane or other fabric over the area but I wouldn’t leave it for long.
    Wirral. Sandy, free draining soil.


  • If you have access to some wire mesh fencing and some iron rebar you could fix a rough skeleton of metal to fit in the hollowed out area to support a dryish mix of concrete you could mix up in a wheelbarrow. Simply push the concrete mix onto the skeleton of iron and wire and smooth off with a trowel and if you put it together right let it dry solid into a little patch of home made reinforced concrete. Depends if you have done any plastering or concrete work in the past or are willing to give it a go. There could be a tendency for the mix to slump out so fixing the metal in place to keep it all together while it sets would be important as would be not adding too much water to the mix.
  • If you have access to some wire mesh fencing and some iron rebar you could fix a rough skeleton of metal to fit in the hollowed out area to support a dryish mix of concrete you could mix up in a wheelbarrow. Simply push the concrete mix onto the skeleton of iron and wire and smooth off with a trowel and if you put it together right let it dry solid into a little patch of home made reinforced concrete. Depends if you have done any plastering or concrete work in the past or are willing to give it a go. There could be a tendency for the mix to slump out so fixing the metal in place to keep it all together while it sets would be important as would be not adding too much water to the mix.
    Thank you! How do I fix the bars into the gap?
  • McRazzMcRazz Posts: 419
    Does anyone know what I can do to this without having to get someone in and having the wall rebuilt. A temp fix I know at most but what can I do?! Just make it look tidy. 

    This wall is unsafe because moisture has penetrated from behind and you can see by the shape it is causing pretty significant heave to the structure causing it to crumble, and it looks like this has been going on for some time. Unfortunately for you (but fortunately for everyone else) there is nothing you can do other than rebuild this wall.

    Without further details i'd assume you're either looking to sell the house or lease it out.

    On that assumption i'd say this is a pretty crummy post from a pretty crummy individual, putting it mildly.
  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 54,873
    Having looked back at your previous posts @poultonj14-C20kxha - dodgy walls seem to be an ongoing problem with your property! 
    I think you'll have to bite the bullet and get someone in - at least to give you an idea of costs to sort it. A botch/temporary job won't really cut it, and will still cost you money. Do you have one of those inyourarea type sites or similar where you can get recommendations of decent tradesmen who would do it? The main drawback of that is that often they aren't interested in small jobs. I had that problem last year when trying to get someone to do a new edging and a bit of paving/concrete for the drive. I ended up doing it myself because none of them even replied to my query.  :|
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
  • Fairygirl said:
    Having looked back at your previous posts @poultonj14-C20kxha - dodgy walls seem to be an ongoing problem with your property! 
    I think you'll have to bite the bullet and get someone in - at least to give you an idea of costs to sort it. A botch/temporary job won't really cut it, and will still cost you money. Do you have one of those inyourarea type sites or similar where you can get recommendations of decent tradesmen who would do it? The main drawback of that is that often they aren't interested in small jobs. I had that problem last year when trying to get someone to do a new edging and a bit of paving/concrete for the drive. I ended up doing it myself because none of them even replied to my query.  :|
    It’s true :) the last one we covered with a fence 🤣 
  • McRazz said:
    Does anyone know what I can do to this without having to get someone in and having the wall rebuilt. A temp fix I know at most but what can I do?! Just make it look tidy. 

    This wall is unsafe because moisture has penetrated from behind and you can see by the shape it is causing pretty significant heave to the structure causing it to crumble, and it looks like this has been going on for some time. Unfortunately for you (but fortunately for everyone else) there is nothing you can do other than rebuild this wall.

    Without further details i'd assume you're either looking to sell the house or lease it out.

    On that assumption i'd say this is a pretty crummy post from a pretty crummy individual, putting it mildly.
    Crummy Individual? Bit odd.
    no it’s my first home and I don’t have much money. 
  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 54,873
    I doubt your fence will do the job for long @poultonj14-C20kxha, but I also understand how hard it is with a first home and b*gger all funds!  Been there...  :)

    It's often a 'rock and a hard place' scenario - pardon the pun.  ;)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
  • If you have access to some wire mesh fencing and some iron rebar you could fix a rough skeleton of metal to fit in the hollowed out area to support a dryish mix of concrete you could mix up in a wheelbarrow. Simply push the concrete mix onto the skeleton of iron and wire and smooth off with a trowel and if you put it together right let it dry solid into a little patch of home made reinforced concrete. Depends if you have done any plastering or concrete work in the past or are willing to give it a go. There could be a tendency for the mix to slump out so fixing the metal in place to keep it all together while it sets would be important as would be not adding too much water to the mix.
    Thank you! How do I fix the bars into the gap?

    I'd simply hammer short pieces of bar into  the softer surfaces in the gap to the point where they wouldn't be sticking out when the concrete is finished. Once you have a few short pieces hammered in your could use wire to tie other bits of iron length ways across the face to give it strength in that direction with the fence wire.
  • owd potterowd potter Posts: 968
    No. Don't botch it up.
    Are you a reasonably competent DIYer?
    A few hundred ££'s and a couple weeks graft will see a proper fix done.  
    Just another day at the plant...
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