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Long shot...but does anyone know much about the behaviour of crows?

I'm hoping someone can help with my crow query..!!

There's a crow which is constantly calling all day, flying around various spots in the neighbourhood and just cawing. It sits there doing the three caws they normally do, over and over and over - not aggressively, but just constantly.

It's been doing this for about a week now, and I have no idea why. If it was aggressive and a one off, then it would be a danger call, but it perches on various trees, fences, roofs etc all around the neighbourhood and makes these caws all day long.

At first I thought it might be in distress, then I thought maybe it was a mating thing, but it is going on and on, and I am baffled.

Does anyone have an explanation for this? (I'm just trying to understand our feathered friends, is all)

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Posts

  • JennyJJennyJ Posts: 10,414
    Perhaps its mate has come to grief :(
    Doncaster, South Yorkshire. Soil type: sandy, well-drained
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Posts: 87,829
    They’re also very territorial especially at this time of year, so he could well be defending the pair’s territory around the nest. They won’t want any other corvids around, particularly jays and magpies who might steal eggs. 

    Gardening in Central Norfolk on improved gritty moraine over chalk ... free-draining.





  • nutcutletnutcutlet Posts: 27,412
    lots of Corvid competition here plus a busy time harassing the Red Kites


    In the sticks near Peterborough
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Posts: 87,829
    https://www.bbc.co.uk/sounds/play/p0bz4ylm?partner=uk.co.bbc&origin=share-mobile

    Lots about carrion crows and other wildlife on this edition of The Countryside Hour.  Check out the whole series … it’s brilliant. 

    Gardening in Central Norfolk on improved gritty moraine over chalk ... free-draining.





  • ShepsSheps Posts: 2,221
    @Dovefromabove a firm favourite of mine since your recommendation last year, one of the best listens on BBC Sounds.
  • Anna33Anna33 Posts: 316
    Thank you all! I'll assume it's a territory thing, given all of the above comments, but I've not seen any sign of there ever being two, so maybe it's marking its territory in anticipation... I really hope that it's not missing a life partner, that would be really sad. It was something I had considered, that it might be grieving or similar, but the behaviour seems a bit more determined than simple grief.

    I have also half thought this might be a nice opportunity to make friends with a crow, because it comes down so close sometimes, but realistically that would be for my benefit, not the crow's...!

    And @Dovefromabove, thank you for this link. I shall give this a listen and see what I find out. Looking at all the previous available episodes, it looks like I could be here for a while...
  • Anna33Anna33 Posts: 316
    nutcutlet said:
    lots of Corvid competition here plus a busy time harassing the Red Kites

    I find watching crows mob a bird of prey utterly fascinating. They show no fear - it's awesome.
  • coccinellacoccinella Posts: 1,361
    I like Corvids except when they harass buzzards. At this time of year they are defending their nest and can be vicious to even their own. But I think your crow is longing after a mate.
    btw thank you @Dovefromabove, another programme to add to my night list 😉

    Luxembourg
  • philippasmith2philippasmith2 Posts: 3,675
    Anna33 said:


    I have also half thought this might be a nice opportunity to make friends with a crow, because it comes down so close sometimes, but realistically that would be for my benefit, not the crow's...!
    ..
    Corvids are certainly amongst the most intelligent of birds and getting "up close" can prove an interesting experience.
    I had a Jackdaw for many years - a rescuee from the vet. clinic I worked for - and tho he was unable to fly, his behaviour was fascinating. He was named Boris but that was back in the 1970's so well before the current one was on the scene - my Boris was a lot smarter too  :D  
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Posts: 87,829
    When crows harass buzzards it's because they're protecting their nests ... if they didn't chase them off their young would be the buzzard's lunch .... buzzards are well able to look after themselves.   :)

    Gardening in Central Norfolk on improved gritty moraine over chalk ... free-draining.





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