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Lawns

Hi There,

See enclosed photo, the condition of my lawn has deteriorated badly over the Autumn and Winter, all seemed ok when I did my final cut in September and I have nothing no differently from any other year.  Usually every April I would apply evergreen 4 in 1 but are concerned that this have no impact.

Any ideas what the issue is and what I need to do?

Regards

G
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Posts

  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 54,819
    Whereabouts are you? Local climate, compaction, poor drainage, lack of rain - any, or a mixture of them, can be factors.
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
  • SicamoreSicamore Posts: 16
    N. Ireland, never had any problems before, weather no different than any other autumn / winter.
  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 54,819
    Not sure then. It might be a build up of thatch in the yellow areas, but I wonder if it's damage from leather jackets and the grass has died off in those areas? They eat through the roots.
    I've noticed a lot of lawns have damage from crows/magpies digging them out, which we don't usually have, but the autumn was very mild, so I think they've survived more easily this winter. That could be a reason. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
  • bédébédé Posts: 3,071
    edited March 2023
    Could have been standing water, also root-eating insects like wireworma or cockchafer grubs.

    In Surrey the weather in every winter is different to the last.  2022-23 especially so.
     location: Surrey Hills, England, ex-woodland acidic sand.
    "Have nothing in your garden that you don't know to be useful, or believe to be beautiful."
  • Grow some wildflowers
    Happy Gardening
  • SicamoreSicamore Posts: 16
    Over and above the wildflowers any other suggestions how to fix it?
  • JennyJJennyJ Posts: 10,431
    If you want to keep it as lawn, rake out the dead stuff and overseed the thin/bare areas. But if you've got some kind of root-eating creature, they might just do the same again.
    Doncaster, South Yorkshire. Soil type: sandy, well-drained
  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 54,819
    The OP is asking for help with the grass though, not looking for an alternative to it.

    I'd do as @JennyJ suggests, but yes - it can be an ongoing thing if you have crane flies etc.   :)
    Have you had a close look at those yellowing areas @Sicamore? It's hard to see clearly in the pic. A few close ups could be helpful    :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
  • SicamoreSicamore Posts: 16
    Hi There,

    See enclosed a few more close up photos which may be of asssistance.


  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 54,819
    I think something's been poking in about there. You can see holes in that third pic especially. My guess would be grubs of some kind have done the damage and birds have been rooting around to get them. The only ones we really get here where I am are leatherjackets, but you may have others where you are- like chafers for example.
     
    It's not badgers as they'd just wreck the place completely.  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
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