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Not sure what to do with front lawn

Hey guys I am having my drive brindle blockpaved tomorrow and I am looking for ideas on what I should do to the front lawn.

The soil is very hard and nothing will grow in it apart from grass.


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Posts

  • fidgetbonesfidgetbones Posts: 17,574
    Any soil can be improved by removing any bricks or other matter left by builders and adding lots of organic matter such as well rotted farm yard manure.
  • Slow-wormSlow-worm Posts: 1,576
    Wildflowers will grow there, they don't need decent soil. You could get some seeds going, then just dig out patches or edges of the grass and plant the seedlings out. 
    There's lots of ornamental grasses you could put in too, and lavenders would probably be fine.
  • Slow-worm said:
    Wildflowers will grow there, they don't need decent soil. You could get some seeds going, then just dig out patches or edges of the grass and plant the seedlings out. 
    There's lots of ornamental grasses you could put in too, and lavenders would probably be fine.

    That's a good idea.

    I think it would look good if all around the edges were dug out and then planted wildflower seeds all around.

    Do you think I should put something in the middle? I was thinking maybe a rose or something?
  • B3B3 Posts: 27,305
    I don't like straight lines in a garden so I would cut a wide sinuous border running between the far end and the right of your photo and plant it up with whatever appealed..  As the years progressed. I would keep nibbling bits off the grass to make the flower bed wider - but that's me.
    In London. Keen but lazy.
  • Slow-wormSlow-worm Posts: 1,576
    Yeah why not? Dig a big 'ole and put a load of compost in. 👍
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Posts: 87,863
    It all depends on what style of garden you like and how much work and ongoing maintenance you are happy to do. To be honest, that lawn doesn’t look too bad and if you’ve a busy life it might be simpler to leave it ‘minimal’ and concentrate on your back garden where you probably will spend more time. 

    Gardening in Central Norfolk on improved gritty moraine over chalk ... free-draining.





  • It also depends on which direction it faces. Is it south facing? It clearly gets the sun! Like Slow-worm, I'd put in lavender, but also plenty of crocuses, of various colours.
    If it doesn't get much sun, then hellebores for winter colour, and maybe a few shrubs to attract the bees. Pyracantha to produce berries for birds, or callicarpa. 
  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 54,794
    What would you like to do with it @rickystokesaa?
    What plants do you like or not like, what time do you have to create beds/borders, and maintain them, what kind of budget do you have, what sort of look do you like - formal, contemporary, cottagey etc? All these things are important.  :)
    The big problem with wildflowers is - you'll have a fair bit of empty space over winter. It can be a magnet for 'animal' waste, to be polite.

    If you fancy a specimen in the middle, that's quite easy to do. Remove the turf [circle or square etc depending on preference] improve the soil there, and choose a shrub or tree that will suit your conditions - ie how wet/dry/hot/cold a part of the country you're in, and the aspect of the site - ie how much sun/shade it gets. It doesn't even need to be in the centre.  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
  • PlantmindedPlantminded Posts: 3,461
    Your lawn does look good considering last summer and the winter we've just had.  I'm thinking along the same line as @Dovefromabove, I'd be inclined to leave it and concentrate on the back garden.  @Slow-worm's recommendation for ornamental grasses and lavender would be easy to manage and give you some interest and impact by mid summer.  They can both tolerate dry, difficult soil but will need regular watering in the first year while they get established. My favourite grasses are Calamagrostis Karl Foerster, any Miscanthus variety and Panicum Northwind.
    Wirral. Sandy, free draining soil.


  • GardenerSuzeGardenerSuze Posts: 5,621
    You could cut out a circular lawn if it is flat enough and plant around that maybe.
     Retired Gardener, new build garden, clay soil, South Notts.


    The more I garden the less I know but the more pleasure I get from it. Monty Don 
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