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Should I remove my asters?

Hi I hope you guys can help. Last year I split some asters that came with a pot I bought. And planted a few all over the garden. They have spread so vigorously, and I'm worried that they will out compete all my perennials and shrubs. I have already attempted to remove some from around some rhodendrums amd peonies but they seem to have stronger suckeres than mint. Many thanks.

Posts

  • GardenerSuzeGardenerSuze Posts: 3,499
    Now would be an idea time to split them as they are showing new growth.Avoid doing this job if ground is very wet or frozen.
    RETIRED GARDENER, LIVES IN SOUTH NOTTS, SOIL CLAY.

    'Tis sweet to visit the still wood,where springs. The first flower of the plain. Longfellow.
  • Some asters are very vigorous and can be spilt annually. They are one of the few plants you can divide at almost any time. I would say this has been a relatively tough winter for plants so the fact they have put on that much growth means you can probably expect them to run to this extent every year. If they're tall and you want rid you might find a local flower farmer (flowersfromthefarm.co.uk) who would be happy to take them. I would and I'm in South Bucks!
  • Thank you for your advice, I think you are right about splitting them annually, as they are great flowers to have because the colour and flowering period. So I'll split them and move to the middle of the bed, as they are very tall ones, and transplant to other areas of the garden. 
  • WatsoniaWatsonia Posts: 113
    I have the same variety looking at your photos. I rather like them, but they are thugs in my garden. They throw out a lot of runners and take over if not managed annually. I take the new shoots & roots out every year from areas I don’t want them. I have transplanted a few as well and they take very easily. This year I was a bit more heavy handed as they completely engulfed my sedums and gooseberry bushes. 

    I also remove shoots at any time of year, should I have not gotten to all of them in spring, and it doesn’t seem to do the plant any harm, it easily can double in size every year. I would be careful with moving them to the middle of the bed, it will permit them to spread in all directions. It’s easy at the beginning of the season but by mid summer next year they could cover a lot of the planting around.
  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 50,133
    Yes - there's a few varieties that are a bit thuggish, to say the least. Many are prone to mildew when they aren't intent on world domination!
    All you can do is keep dividing, and either giving the divisions away, or chucking them out.
    Another alternative is to remove as many plants as you can, and then create a sturdy physical barrier in the beds/borders for one or two. It'll depend how enthusiastic you are about doing that though...
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
  • GardenerSuzeGardenerSuze Posts: 3,499
    I think the novae angliae forms are less prone to mildew. Should get used to the new latin name but Aster is so much easier.
    RETIRED GARDENER, LIVES IN SOUTH NOTTS, SOIL CLAY.

    'Tis sweet to visit the still wood,where springs. The first flower of the plain. Longfellow.
  • Thank you yes it definitely sounds like lots of dividing is needed. I was thinking of digging some clumps out and then planting in pots in the ground to hopefully minimise their spread?
  • GardenerSuzeGardenerSuze Posts: 3,499
    edited 16 March
    @carloapicella117QmuH0h6G Not sure that will work, they will  become pot bound and dry. They will root deeply through the holes into the ground looking for moisture.
    RETIRED GARDENER, LIVES IN SOUTH NOTTS, SOIL CLAY.

    'Tis sweet to visit the still wood,where springs. The first flower of the plain. Longfellow.
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