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Tonight's Worm Moon

It's that time of year again, the last full moon of winter. It's a clear night over the Fens with temperatures set to plummet to -1, not the promised -5 thank goodness.

No doubt practical forum members will know why tonight's moon is named the 'Worm Moon', but I've only just read that Native American tribes named the last moon of winter after the worms who are now on the move due to the warming of the earth. 

There's something quite comforting about 'listening' to nature, after all 'She' knows best  ;)
Trying to be the person my dog thinks I am! 

Cambridgeshire/Norfolk border.

Posts

  • nutcutletnutcutlet Posts: 27,420
    Already -1.5C in my bit of Fens.
    and OH says it's crunchy out there (he had to get a few more logs in)


    In the sticks near Peterborough
  • ObelixxObelixx Posts: 30,010
    We have rain - at last - so no moon gazing here and no frosts.  A toasty 7C low tonight after all the clear skies and frosts.

    As for the worm moon, the name has several possible origins including earthworm activity but also beetle larvae getting busy but that only applies if it occurs before the spring equinox.  After that it's called a Paschal (Easter) moon.  There are other American Indian names for it too.

    https://www.almanac.com/content/full-moon-march   
    Vendée - 20kms from Atlantic coast.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • MikeOxgreenMikeOxgreen Posts: 807
    It's -3 here and set to get worse, but i'm enjoying worm talk.
    I never knew  :)
  • JennyJJennyJ Posts: 10,432
    The paschal moon is the one that determines the date of Easter Sunday, whether it falls in March or April (Easter Sunday being the first Sunday after the first full moon after the spring equinox in the western church). For me it's still either the worm moon or the pink moon, because those names come from a non-christian culture.

    Doncaster, South Yorkshire. Soil type: sandy, well-drained
  • Jenny_AsterJenny_Aster Posts: 936
    edited March 2023
    Obelixx said:
    We have rain - at last - so no moon gazing here and no frosts.  A toasty 7C low tonight after all the clear skies and frosts.

    As for the worm moon, the name has several possible origins including earthworm activity but also beetle larvae getting busy but that only applies if it occurs before the spring equinox.  After that it's called a Paschal (Easter) moon.  There are other American Indian names for it too.

    https://www.almanac.com/content/full-moon-march   
    You've sent me down one of those internet 'rabbit holes'  :#:smile:

    Reading the comments at the end of the linked webpage, there was one comment that said worms are an invasive species in America, carried there through plant root balls and ships ballast. For a creature that doesn't move very fast they've certainly been busy over the past 500 years. Surely is that even possible that such an important species didn't evolve there?

    It does look like the 'science' isn't settled from the little research I did. Though I was under the impression that worms were extremely important to soil structure and its fertility, and that worms are as important as pollinators. 

    Maybe it's the nightcrawler type of worms that have invaded America, and that there had always been other types of worms on that continent? I think perhaps there is genuine concern about ancient forests in the Americas as the 'invaders' appear to have changed the forest's environment from a fungi driven system to a bacterial one. The 'science' is way above my head  ;)

    My wormery is in it's 2nd year so I'm fascinated by them, though I still don't like to touch them  :#

    Last summer I lost about 90% of my worms (they must have escaped as I didn't see many dead ones) but there was a huge amount of worms in the surrounding soil. During the searing hot weather we had; I started adding ice cubes on top of their scraps/food in an attempt to cool the wormery down. I didn't realise until it was too late that the wormery had become sodden and not happy. The poor creatures packed their bags and did a flit! I cleaned out the wormery, added new bedding with a good measure of their 'old' bedding. There must have been loads of eggs in the old bedding as in no time the wormery had repopulated itself with masses of tiny worms. Those tiny worms are now a fair size. I still need to watch the moisture levels as those little fellas certainly like to wee a lot! I'm more vigilant about draining the fluid off now, mixing it with a couple gallons of water, it looks to make a good liquid feed (the roses love it) though on the internet I've read it's advisable to discard it as it's anaerobic. 


    Trying to be the person my dog thinks I am! 

    Cambridgeshire/Norfolk border.
  • UffUff Posts: 3,199
    I'd not heard of a worm moon but it was lovely last night. 
    Interesting hearing about your wormery @Jenny-Aster.
    SW SCOTLAND but born in Derbyshire
  • ObelixxObelixx Posts: 30,010
    @Jenny_Aster New Zealabd flatworms are a new danger in the UK - arriving with imported plants they have no obvious predator but like to eat native earthworms for dinner.  Not good.

    I daresay the north American content had worms and fungae, as do Europe including the UK, but the balance will change according to human activity and,more recently, climate change.
    Vendée - 20kms from Atlantic coast.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • M33R4M33R4 Posts: 291
    I had zero sleep last night. Tossed and turned all night - perhaps it's the moon!

     :# 
    I wish I could garden all year round!
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