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Jicama Seeds

Jenny_AsterJenny_Aster Posts: 935
edited 3 March in Fruit & veg
I like to have a go at growing something unusual, and this year I'm thinking of growing Jicama plants from seeds. They're low-carb/high fibre which fits my current hobby-horse.

Just wondering if anyone else has grown them? I know they're not native to the UK, so I'm not expecting a prize crop.

Does anyone have any advice? Negative 'Cost-benefit analysis' is a given  ;)

(Approx. 10 seeds for £3.95 at Chiltern Seeds.)
Trying to be the person my dog thinks I am! 

Cambridgeshire/Norfolk border.

Posts

  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 54,353
    Not heard of those before @Jenny_Aster, but I had a look. Quite similar to many root veg, even though it's apparently a bean relative,  so I expect they could be good roasted for soup? Stir fries and salads too.  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
  • SkandiSkandi Posts: 1,721
    Oh sorry I will say they taste amazing I remember having some in the US, (raw on salad) but I do think they are a multi year crop? And you need to be able to keep them warm over winter. If I'm wrong there I might have a go myself.
  • Jenny_AsterJenny_Aster Posts: 935
    Skandi said:
    Oh sorry I will say they taste amazing I remember having some in the US, (raw on salad) but I do think they are a multi year crop? And you need to be able to keep them warm over winter. If I'm wrong there I might have a go myself.
    It would be interesting to taste, I've read they can be described as being between a water chestnut and an apple when eaten raw, but when cooked they act like a sponge and absorb flavours from other foods cooked with them. Other things I've learnt in case anyone is interested:

    • They're very high fibre and Vit C, low in carbs and potassium
    • Contains inulin. Studies show that inulin can increase the frequency of bowel movements by up to 31% in those with constipation 
    • A member of the 'nightshade' family
    • Grow indoors in early spring and harvest early winter (presumably before a heavy frost) so they have a long growing season - 5 to 9 months from sowing to harvest
    • Their hard skin shouldn't be eaten as it contains a toxic substance
    • Remove the flowers so energy is diverted to the tubers
    • Can only be grown from seeds, tubers cannot be used to grow the next season plants unlike a potato
    • Their crunch texture and pleasant taste lends themselves to be eaten raw, and they pair well with avocado, citrus and strong flavoured herbs
    • They're said to be a good potato substitute, they fry and bake well 
    • Makes Mexican dishes more authentic
    I'll share a pic of my first Jicama meal  ;)




    Trying to be the person my dog thinks I am! 

    Cambridgeshire/Norfolk border.
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