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Self-seeded heuchera?

Am I right in thinking these are heuchera seedlings? They are very small, the other green plant is moss.




PS - Original photos didn’t rotate. Looks like the glitch’s been fixed!
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  • Lizzie27Lizzie27 Posts: 12,431
    @pitter-patter, they look very much like it to me - lucky you. None of mine have ever self-seeded.
    North East Somerset - Clay soil over limestone
  • Yes - a Heuchera - Palace Purple maybe ?  There are so many varieties now. 
    I find the dark leaved ones appreciate a bit of sun whilst the yellow ones do best in semi shade. 
  • Thank you, I shall pot them up and see how they turn out.
  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 54,905
    Most of my dark ones came from seedlings in the steps at work. No idea what variety they are, but they do self seed. Nice when you get a freebie  @pitter-patter  :)

    They're very easy to divide too. That might suit you better @Lizzie27, if you're not getting seedlings. I don't tend to get seedlings from the yellowy/green ones. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
  • It’s a first for me as well. I have lots of varieties, though the dry, sunny conditions in this garden doesn’t necessarily suit them. As you say, @Fairygirl, they divide easily and I always have cuttings on the go to replace older specimens. 
  • Lizzie27Lizzie27 Posts: 12,431
    @Fairygirl, just realized that I might not get seedlings because I usually cut the dead flower stalks off!

    Can you advise the best way to divide them please. I've got some really nice pink ones which have heaved up and gone all woody. Do I just cut these stems off at the base and pot them up or dig the whole thing up?  Sorry, I know you don't like pink!!
    North East Somerset - Clay soil over limestone
  • Lizzie27Lizzie27 Posts: 12,431
    Pic of my pink one. Many thanks.
    North East Somerset - Clay soil over limestone
  • GardenerSuzeGardenerSuze Posts: 5,646
    edited February 2023
    @Lizzie 27 Just dig up split and plant more deeply. If you look at the stems you can see various points at which they root. If they break no worries still plant them they will be fine. You may take the opportunity to throw some of the oldest woody parts.
    I have worked as a Gardener for 24 years. My latest garden is a new build garden on heavy clay.
  • pitter-patterpitter-patter Posts: 2,417
    edited February 2023
    You can either dig the whole plant out and bury it further down - this usually results in all the stems creating roots. It can then be easily divided later in the year. Or you can take cuttings in the usual way, cut a stem off, remove lower leaves, if they’re any, and put it in a pot, or back in the soil. Keep them in the shade and water them from time to time. I keep mine in a closed transparent box to keep the moisture in for longer. I’m terrible at remembering to water seedlings and cuttings.
  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 54,905
    Lizzie27 said:
    @Fairygirl, just realized that I might not get seedlings because I usually cut the dead flower stalks off!


     :D 

    Those ones which have pulled themselves out can be dug up and buried more deeply. I just noticed today that one of mine has done that so it'll need attended to soon. It's also spread and has a woody stem -like a runner, off to one side, so I might just pull that off and pot it up and see how it goes. I've not had that happen before. 

    I do just pull bits off and pot them up though, and it's a good idea when they've done that lifting up thing which is quite annoying! As long as there's some root, they'll take. You can even stick them in water and they'll root away quite readily.  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
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