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Acer transplanting

Hi, 
   I have a 15 year Japanese Acer which is getting pot bound (albeit in a large pot). To maintain the height of the plant I was thinking of cutting the base of the pot off and allowing the plant to root into the soil. Does this sound plausible or can anyone see any problems I may encounter,
thanks in advance

Posts

  • UffUff Posts: 3,199
    Bunny Guinness is a great advocate of using this method. If you Google her channel on Youtube she tells all about it. I must say that hers look good.
    SW SCOTLAND but born in Derbyshire
  • Uff said:
    Bunny Guinness is a great advocate of using this method. If you Google her channel on Youtube she tells all about it. I must say that hers look good.
    Thanks. Wasn't expecting such a speedy response. Will have a look now👍😀
  • Cutting the base of the pot off and allowing the plant to root into the soil could be a viable solution to address the issue of your pot-bound Japanese Acer. However, there are some potential problems to consider before doing so.

    Firstly, if the plant has been growing in the same pot for a long time, its roots may have become tightly bound and could struggle to adapt to the new soil. This can cause the plant to go into shock or even die.

    Secondly, if the potting mix in the current pot is vastly different from the soil in which you plan to plant it, the plant may struggle to adapt to the new conditions, which could cause it to wilt or die.

    Lastly, if the plant has been growing in a shaded area or indoors for a long time, it may be unable to handle the sudden exposure to full sun or harsh outdoor conditions, which could also lead to stress or death.

    Therefore, before taking any action, it is essential to assess the health of the plant and its adaptability to the new conditions. It might be a better idea to gradually introduce the plant to its new environment by slowly acclimating it to the new soil and sun exposure over a few weeks or months. This will allow the plant to adjust without experiencing stress.

  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 54,819
    @john hume 606-  Ignore the poster @rootgroot143ZaTwIc0 - it's a spammer, copy and paster. 
    The fact that they don't realise the plant is outdoors says it all.  :)

    I'd go with the advice already given re taking the bottom off. You may need to tease roots a bit, and some will probably break, so just keep an eye on it for the next few months if you're doing it soon.
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
  • AlchemistAlchemist Posts: 273
    I have successfully transplanted a 5 year old acer from a 60 cm pot to ground (no pot). The plant didn’t notice a thing - has gone from 8 feet to 10 feet in 2 years and  looks a lot healthier. Spring as opposed to winter is a good time to do this (Borrowed wisdom from a specialist acer nursery). Note you may have to treat it as a pot specimen for 2+ years/ till it roots and water it, if you leave the pot in situ. 
  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 54,819
    It's always pretty straightforward planting from a pot into the ground [providing the ground is appropriately prepped of course] but it's not quite the same as just taking the bottom off the pot @Alchemist, which is what @john hume 606 is planning.  :)
    The roots will still be 'contained' up to a point, but will be able to access soil, and therefore moisture/nutrients, far more easily than when isolated in a pot.
    However, you're right - it would still be regarded more as a pot specimen, and won't thrive and improve in the same way as yours has. The OP's plant would always be better completely planted out    :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
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