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Design ideas

Hi All, 

So, I recently posted in the problem solving forum regarding a recent construction from a neighbour which has caused quite an eyesore. I'm going down the route of ensuring they have complied with building regs but I suspect that they have so am also planning how to hide the new construction. 

It had been suggestions to use Trellis. I have a few questions. 

What climbing plant would people recommend? 
How would the climbing plant need to be "planted" / attached to the trellis for it to grow?
I would also need to install our own trellis as the one in the picture is the neighbours and on their side of the wall. Would the trellis need to be installed from the base of the wall so the plant grows up it?

Sorry, may sound like silly questions.

Thanks!

Posts

  • JennyJJennyJ Posts: 10,460
    edited February 2023
    Not silly questions at all - it depends on the climber. Some will self-cling to the wall once they get going (eg ivy, virginia creeper), some need to be tied in (climbing/rambling roses) to a trellis or wires fixed to the wall, some need something that they can twine their stems (eg jasmine) or their leaf stalks (eg clematis) around.
    Doncaster, South Yorkshire. Soil type: sandy, well-drained
  • LynLyn Posts: 23,190

    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • JennyJJennyJ Posts: 10,460
    edited February 2023
    What are the shrubs that you already have in there? Maybe they could be allowed to grow taller, then make the bed wider and grow lower things in front to draw the eye into the garden and away from the ugly building? At least it's a dark colour and not something bright and shiny.
    Doncaster, South Yorkshire. Soil type: sandy, well-drained
  • JennyJ said:
    Not silly questions at all - it depends on the climber. Some will self-cling to the wall once they get going (eg ivy, virginia creeper), some need to be tied in (climbing/rambling roses) to a trellis or wires fixed to the wall, some need something that they can twine their stems (eg jasmine) or their leaf stalks (eg clematis) around.
    Thanks for the examples. I have a bit of research to do!
  • JennyJ said:
    What are the shrubs that you already have in there? Maybe they could be allowed to grow taller, then make the bed wider and grow lower things in front to draw the eye into the garden and away from the ugly building? At least it's a dark colour and not something bright and shiny.
    I'm not entirely sure what they are actually. They are very slow growing. Weve only been in the house about 1 year. 

    In terms taking visibility away from the building you could be right. Although I would say the picture may not entirely do it justice as to how much it stands out when you look back further. But it could also just be because its so different to what we usually look at. :smile:
  • JennyJJennyJ Posts: 10,460
    We do get used to things quite quickly. Your tree will also soften the view when it comes into leaf.
    Doncaster, South Yorkshire. Soil type: sandy, well-drained
  • PlantmindedPlantminded Posts: 3,491
    A staggered row of evergreen or semi-evergreen shrubs with potentially tree like proportions in front of your wall may be a possibility.  I used a mix of Buddleja, Griselinia, Bamboo, Portuguese laurel, Bay, and Thuja plicata in my back garden to screen my neighbour's home office which I can't see now from my house and patio.
    Wirral. Sandy, free draining soil.


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