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Ashes from the fireplace

Before I splash out on an old style metal dustbin for the garden, are the ashes from the fireplace any good for sprinkling around roses, camellia's, etc. Thanks. 

Posts

  • It depends a lot on what you’re burning …

    Gardening in Central Norfolk on improved gritty moraine over chalk ... free-draining.





  • Wood and coal
  • Wood ash is fine in the garden and adds potash (if used fresh), but coal ash contains heavy metals and isn't recommended - especially not around edible crops.
    Since 2019 I've lived in east Clare, in the west of Ireland.
  • "Ashes from a fireplace" great title for book.
    Trying to be the person my dog thinks I am! 

    Cambridgeshire/Norfolk border.
  • My fire produces mixed ash which I have been using to create paths around the garden. I put down buckets full which I tread firm to level, lay thick weed membrane over it, and eventually, one day, will put bark chips down. Any I do not use goes in my black bag refuse sack.
  • My fire produces mixed ash which I have been using to create paths around the garden. I put down buckets full which I tread firm to level, lay thick weed membrane over it, and eventually, one day, will put bark chips down. Any I do not use goes in my black bag refuse sack.
    Whilst the RHS said 
    • Ash from coal or anthracite is best disposed of through the council rubbish collection since it has little or no nutritional benefit and is potentially harmful to soil, plants and consumers of edible produce
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