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PLANTS AND MOVING HOUSE

GardenerSuzeGardenerSuze I garden in South Notts on an improved clay soil Posts: 3,048
I am hoping to move later this year. It will be a new property with a small garden. Last autumn I did lift and split about fifty plants mostly perennials, labelled them and planted in just one sheltered area of the garden, ready for the move. I have done this kind of thing before for someone but on a big scale and it was to another large garden. Downsizing is different, I need to be tough with myself.

I am wondering if I should cut my plant list and just concentrate on half as many plants but use larger pieces?  I don't plan on moving shrubs as I want to leave this garden still looking good, it has been mine for a long time.
Have you moved recently and taken plants with you, how do you let purchasers know what you plan to do, is it through the solicitor? I would welcome advice.
The most serious gardening I do would seem very strange to an onlooker,for it involves hours of walking round in circles,apparently doing nothing. Helen Dillon.
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  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 9,853
    I can't really advise re. the plants, but you should agree with your purchasers what your plans are re.
    You could call your conveyancer and mention it to them too so they have a note on file.

    My only thoughts on the plants are - if you take lots of different species, you'll be able to split/take cuttings from them once in your new home.
    I'd probably do a bit of both.
    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • NormandyLizNormandyLiz Seine Maritime, FrancePosts: 66
    If you're talking about selling a house moving, rather than moving from rented accommodation, you'll have a form to fill in listing all the fixtures and fittings, and what is and what isn't included in the sale. You can show there what plants you intend to take with you, so what is not included in the sale. To be doubly sure, though, I would also ask the estate agent to make sure a purchaser knew so there can't be any upset later.


  • NormandyLizNormandyLiz Seine Maritime, FrancePosts: 66
    ETA - and yes, that form is through the solicitor.
  • LiriodendronLiriodendron Scariff, County Clare, IrelandPosts: 7,848
    When you put your house on the market you have to fill in a comprehensive form, which details what you're taking and leaving (almost down to the last nut & bolt...).  We moved 3 years ago and had to do this.  All the plants we took were potted up (moving from Yorkshire to Ireland, before B..x.t made exporting them illegal) so we didn't have to list them - we moved before the house was sold.  But in your case I think you'd be covered if you said you'd be taking something like "all the plants in such & such an area".  We did list a large planter we wanted to take, to be on the safe side.

    It's really diffilcult to know what to advise about number/size of plants...  have you chosen your new house & garden?  If not, the final decision will obviously depend on the size of the plot, its aspect, soil etc, although I must admit I brought some plants with me to this garden because I loved them, rather than because I thought they'd grow well and look great... it's such a personal thing.
    "The one who plants trees, knowing that he will never sit in their shade, has at least started to understand the meaning of life."  Rabindranath Tagore
  • GardenerSuzeGardenerSuze I garden in South Notts on an improved clay soil Posts: 3,048
    Thankyou to you all for your advice. I shall now have this thread as a reference. In the spring I might start to pot up some things that I have already split  and group then so it can be seen what I intend to take with me. I totally agree with all the comments re aspect. I just want to put together some kind of plan, and hopefully get most of what I decide to take right.  The plants are very important as I know you will understand.
    The most serious gardening I do would seem very strange to an onlooker,for it involves hours of walking round in circles,apparently doing nothing. Helen Dillon.
  • zugeniezugenie Posts: 596
    I took photos of everything I was taking with me and added it as an attachment to the fixtures and fittings forms, but that was because I hadn’t lifted them yet! I specified any pots I was taking (all except one that had a climber in) directly on the f&f form. 

    I did pics for the ones in the ground just to make sure it was 1000% clear what was coming!
  • GardenerSuzeGardenerSuze I garden in South Notts on an improved clay soil Posts: 3,048
    Thankyou @zugenie that seems like a very good idea. I did wonder about some photos.
    The most serious gardening I do would seem very strange to an onlooker,for it involves hours of walking round in circles,apparently doing nothing. Helen Dillon.
  • When I moved I understood that any plants I wanted to take with me had to be in a container and I stated on the form that anything in a pot would be going.
  • GardenerSuzeGardenerSuze I garden in South Notts on an improved clay soil Posts: 3,048
    @Joyce Goldenlily That seems a very easy way to do it so that everyone understands. Thankyou.
    The most serious gardening I do would seem very strange to an onlooker,for it involves hours of walking round in circles,apparently doing nothing. Helen Dillon.
  • You are welcome.

    When I sold my house the new owners said it was the garden that had sold it to them. I left a well-stocked terraced garden but when I went back a couple of years later to visit my old neighbour I looked over the fence to see a barren wasteland with a few lollipop standard roses and a large concrete koi fish pond.
    There is an old adage, Never go back. How true. You have to accept, each to their own. I did grieve for some of the large mature shrubs etc. which I had to leave behind but I had to look forward to creating a new garden where I am now.
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