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Dwarf french bean recommendations

I’m giving up growing a few types of veg in the polytunnel as they have been decimated for 3 years running with something that might be a mosaic virus ( my amateur diagnosis). I did my best to prevent it coming back but am defeated for now. As one replacement, I’m thinking of growing dwarf french beans outside. They have to be dwarf to stand a fighting chance against our wild weather. I would like to sow one early  and one late. I have seen Allegria recommended, but can’t find it anywhere. That’s a late one. Any other recommendations? 

Carmarthenshire (mild, wet, windy). Loam over shale, very slightly sloping, so free draining. Mildly acidic or neutral.


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  • Purple Teepee does well for me and there's plenty of wind here. I don't know if it's early or late, usually only get one shot at things here, short seasons!
  • EmerionEmerion Posts: 575
    Purple Teepee does well for me and there's plenty of wind here. I don't know if it's early or late, usually only get one shot at things here, short seasons!
    Plenty of wind, as in your wigwams fall over despite your best efforts to anchor/shield them? 😀 
    Carmarthenshire (mild, wet, windy). Loam over shale, very slightly sloping, so free draining. Mildly acidic or neutral.


  • Pete.8Pete.8 Posts: 11,275
    I usually sow 3 batches of DFB (May, June and July) to give a supply throughout the summer and early autumn. Each batch comprises just 3-4 plants.
    I've used many varieties over the years - most recently Cobra was very prolific as was Safari.
    I plant them in groups of 3 or 4 with about 2ft between each group so they support each other.
    Pick regularly to keep them coming.
    The yield is extremely good - most go to my neighbours.

    Billericay - Essex

    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • I'm 1300ft up in the Pennines, on the edge of the Peak District. so yes, plenty of wind and wigwams require careful positioning and erection to stand a chance. One reason I grow dwarf beans too :D
    I do have windbreak netting round the veg garden which helps a bit, and there's a good stone wall on the east side which filters the wind from that direction. I also shove lots of things in fairly close together so they help protect each other.
  • EmerionEmerion Posts: 575
    OK, well that’s hopeful. I expect your wigwam-sheltering skills are better than mine. 
    Carmarthenshire (mild, wet, windy). Loam over shale, very slightly sloping, so free draining. Mildly acidic or neutral.


  • Champion are my favourite but I don't think they are available here - prolific and reliable.  I'd also agree with Safari and Cobra .  Orca are usually good too. ( Somerset coastal area in both raised beds and large containers ). 
  • Teepee and safari do well for us. As they are dwarf we do not put up wigwams just twigs to stop the pigeons getting at them. We sow at different times like @Pete.8 this allows for harvesting throughout the summer into winter. We always have a surplus which is passed onto family and friends, frozen and used in chutneys. A good harvest compared to the peas we sow each year.
  • Where I volunteer , we grew dwarf french bean "faraday" seed from Tamar organics - plants were prolific , and really very short ( certainly less than 2 feet / 60 cm , probably more like 45 cm, so should suit windy sites ). Fast maturing and ( in London) pretty pest-free last summer. 
    Kindness is always the right choice.
  • i usually go with two old school varieties either contender 
    or provider.  Since they both work well free standing or 
    with my three sisters variation.  which is similar to the
    one Joy Larkcom used. 

  • Nanny BeachNanny Beach Posts: 8,714
    Annabelle 
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