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Laurel Hedge

Hi

I had these laurels taken back about 2 years ago on the Garden facing side only as they were intruding. I now want to reduce the height. I used a tree surgeon 2 years ago as it needed some chain saw work.

Looking at how much I want to take off I think I could do this on my own with with a telescopic trimmer, as no major branches or trunks up there, and if there is anything there I  could get with ladders and a pruning saw, or is this a tree surgeon job?

Thanks



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Posts

  • nutcutletnutcutlet PeterboroughPosts: 26,877
    Depends on your fitness and equipment. You'd need a ladder or some scaffold to get up there and at least a could set of loppers/saw. Here it would be a DIY job but we're used to it and have the gear
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 9,874
    edited 22 January
    If you feel comfortable doing it and you feel you can do it safely, then go for it.
    Laurel doesn't need any specialist care.
    If you cut them back to 6" they'd soon grow to 6ft again.
    I'd take them lower than your line, as once pruned they will reshoot and grow quickly.
    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • g333g333 Posts: 119
    I feel confident about it, the tools would be ladder, telescopic hedge trimmer, hand pruning saw not sure if I need anything else, can get a telescopic hedge trimmer also which changeable small chain saw attachement
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 49,182
    I often use a bog standard wood saw for hefty trunks on laurel or similar. It's tough stuff and recovers well .
    You should be fine with the tools you have though - just take care up the ladders if you use them  ;)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • EmerionEmerion Carmarthenshire Posts: 442
    As they are rather narrow at the bottom, I would be tempted to saw them right down to the base. They would grow back bushier. Then it would’ve easier to keep them in check with shears in the future. 
    Carmarthenshire 
    If at first you don’t succeed, have some cake. 
  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 21,144
    Emerion said:
    As they are rather narrow at the bottom, I would be tempted to saw them right down to the base. They would grow back bushier. Then it would’ve easier to keep them in check with shears in the future. 
    I absolutely agree with that,  wherever you cut them back too, they will bush out from there, if you want them to bush from the bottom you need to be ruthless with the cutting back,  then keep them in check twice a year. 
    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • g333g333 Posts: 119
    Emerion said:
    As they are rather narrow at the bottom, I would be tempted to saw them right down to the base. They would grow back bushier. Then it would’ve easier to keep them in check with shears in the future. 

    I use these as privacy and wind breakers, so I wouldnt cut these to the base, they have been there for over 30 years the seller told me, and the bases are like proper tree trunks. The most I would cut, would be half way between top of fence and top of laurels, so a little below my current red line.

    They were cut massively back 2 years ago as they were spilling out onto the garden grass area, and in fairness have taken a while to grow back where they are completely manageable now
  • g333g333 Posts: 119
    Lyn said:
    Emerion said:
    As they are rather narrow at the bottom, I would be tempted to saw them right down to the base. They would grow back bushier. Then it would’ve easier to keep them in check with shears in the future. 
    I absolutely agree with that,  wherever you cut them back too, they will bush out from there, if you want them to bush from the bottom you need to be ruthless with the cutting back,  then keep them in check twice a year. 

    Its more the height I want to keep.

    I did toy with the idea of removing these 2 years ago and replant a row of red robin trees or something, but these are establish and hardy and do the privacy and wind job
  • g333g333 Posts: 119
    When would be best to do the work now or wait until start April.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 49,182
    You could certainly do it now, and if your conditions stay mild,  any foliage which appears can be taken off later if it gets weather/temp damage over the next couple of months.  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


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