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Can I cook THIS 800G pork boneless leg joint on gas S (slow) setting?

When I cook a beef steak for example, I seal/brown  it first in a hot frying pan. I then wrap the steak in foil and give it about 5 minutes on gas 7 in the oven top shelf. I then turn the gas down to setting S (slow) for the remaining 1hr 50min. The steak is always tender regardless of the cut.

But what about this pork joint? I want to try the same procedure, but for a longer period. I am guessing 4hrs or 5hrs max. Remember that in foil the heat builds & increases.

Also, although fresh not frozen, is it a good idea take it out of the fridge about  an hr before cooking,

What do our kitcken wizzards think?

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  • Busy-LizzieBusy-Lizzie Posts: 20,360
    I've done that with lamb and pork, but in an electric cooker.

    For pork, after sealing it in a hot pan, then seasoning it, I put chopped onions and sage on the foil then the pork then more onion and sage then I pour a small glass of white wine into the foil, then I wrap up the foil and put it into a hot oven for about 15mins then turn the oven down quite low and leave for about 5 hours. I use the juices in the gravy and the joint is tender, like pulled pork.
    Dordogne and Norfolk
  • fidgetbonesfidgetbones Derbyshire but with a Nottinghamshire postcode. Posts: 16,457
    I stuff pork loin joints like that in a pyrex dish with the lid on and give it about an hour on 200C.  It then slices very easily.
  • Good ideas there-thank you. I best cook it tomoz or Sat. Time is getting on a bit for starting today. I like to eat some while still hot. If I start it about 2pm or 3pm latest that will be a nice evening  dinner, plus roast pork sarnies for a couple of days . 
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 9,850
    I always let big joints of meat come up to room temp before cooking - somewhere between 1-2 hours. With pork it also dries out the skin a bit for good crackling if you were going to roast it.
    A cheap but invaluable bit of kit is a meat thermometer - I bought one off ebay for about £5. It takes the guesswork out of it. When you think it's nearly done check the internal temperature then you can estimate how much longer it may or may not need.

    I often buy a chicken to roast - the instructions say 1.5 hrs. I use a core temp. sensor that came with the oven and the chicken is usually ready not long after 1 hr has passed.
    I tried once for 1.5 hrs and it was very dry.
    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 48,907
    In the current climate re prices of energy - gas or leccy, it's worth having other things in the oven if you're going to have it on for that length of time. Root veg cooked for a while at low temp is great for soup, and you can also freeze some of the veg if you don't need it all at one time.  :)
    I've been doing roast chicken in the air fryer @Pete.8 and it's also quicker. Smaller space to heat up. If I do it in the normal oven - I do it on a bed of veg with stock, then uncover for half an hour at the end. Works a  treat, and your gravy is almost made  ;)
    I'd say the chickens are smaller too- we haven't been doing roasts for a while, but the medium chicken I got at C'mas would have been labelled small a year ago. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • LoxleyLoxley NottinghamPosts: 4,961
    If in doubt, cooking instructions on reverse of label!
  • tui34tui34 Béziers, Herault, FrancePosts: 2,551
    Hi @Busy-Lizzie   Could I do it in the slow cooker instead of the oven?  Sounds lovely!

    A good hoeing is worth two waterings.

  • @Pete.8
    "When you think it's nearly done check the internal temperature then you can estimate how much longer it may or may not need".

    Thanks Pete. 
    I believe I still have a digital  food thermometer that I got to prevent over heating  cooking oil.

    What temp should I be aiming for with the pork joint when I think it may be done?
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 9,850
    edited 19 January
    There are lots of charts on the web for all sorts of meat
    For pork loin well done is 77°C, medium 71°C and medium-rare 63 °C
    I'd go for about 75c. Lower temps it's juicer but often a bit pink if you prefer it that way.
    I only use lower temps with pork tenderloin.

    The probe needs to go into the centre of the joint for accuracy.

    Don't forget to rest it before using it - at least 15mins for a joint that size

    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • Busy-LizzieBusy-Lizzie Posts: 20,360
    tui34 said:
    Hi @Busy-Lizzie   Could I do it in the slow cooker instead of the oven?  Sounds lovely!

    I don't have a slow cooker, but I don't see why not.
    Dordogne and Norfolk
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