Forum home Plants

Dormancy

B3B3 Posts: 27,331
We're told it's going to be a cold week. Is it safe to assume dormancy here in London by next week?
In London. Keen but lazy.
«1

Posts

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Posts: 87,904
    Dunno about dormancy ... hibernation would seem to have its attractions at the moment  ;)

    Gardening in Central Norfolk on improved gritty moraine over chalk ... free-draining.





  • GardenerSuzeGardenerSuze Posts: 5,633
    I think most plants are dormant at this time of year. Perennials do grow over the winter months but very slowly. Some plants do need to be pruned whilst dormant.
     Retired Gardener, new build garden, clay soil, South Notts.


    The more I garden the less I know but the more pleasure I get from it. Monty Don 
  • bédébédé Posts: 3,073
    B3 said:
    We're told it's going to be a cold week. Is it safe to assume dormancy here in London by next week?

    It's English (London) weather. Assume nothing.  Whatever happened in November may be repeated.
     location: Surrey Hills, England, ex-woodland acidic sand.
    "Have nothing in your garden that you don't know to be useful, or believe to be beautiful."
  • B3B3 Posts: 27,331
    True.
    In London. Keen but lazy.
  • GardenerSuzeGardenerSuze Posts: 5,633
    @B3 Do you have a specific job you want to do in your garden? 
     Retired Gardener, new build garden, clay soil, South Notts.


    The more I garden the less I know but the more pleasure I get from it. Monty Don 
  • B3B3 Posts: 27,331
    edited January 2023
    Pruning acer, fig and roses but the weather has been pretty mild mostly and the buds were beginning to swell on both. It's the acer and fig that I'm more concerned about. I've had plenty of advice from members about the roses so I think I know what I'm doing with them 😐 @GardenerSuze
    In London. Keen but lazy.
  • GardenerSuzeGardenerSuze Posts: 5,633
    I see, it is very cold here at the moment and therefore not something I would recommend. I don't grow them @Fairygirl may have advice although she is further north.
    I am sure you have been waiting as autumn was late this year, but I would wait for a milder spell. 
     Retired Gardener, new build garden, clay soil, South Notts.


    The more I garden the less I know but the more pleasure I get from it. Monty Don 
  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 54,860
    I don't grow figs or roses [don't like either of them] but the Acer should be fine, assuming you haven't got severe weather in the offing. By that I don't mean a couple of light frosts or half an inch of snow  ;)
    Even then, any damage will be replaced by new - within reason. I don't really look at mine until much later, but my conditions will be different here. 
    Taking small dead bits off can be done at any time, as long as live tissue isn't damaged, especially in late spring/summer.   
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
  • B3B3 Posts: 27,331
    Thanks @Fairygirl and @GardenerSuze. Extreme cold is unlikely here, it was the swelling buds that concerned me but if I don't do it now I might miss the dormancy boat for the acer, I suppose.
    In London. Keen but lazy.
  • bédébédé Posts: 3,073
    edited January 2023
    B3 said: Extreme cold is unlikely here, 

     Kent borders?  Famous last words.

    Acers do bleed, but not until the sap is flowing.  In my experience, it causes little damage.
     location: Surrey Hills, England, ex-woodland acidic sand.
    "Have nothing in your garden that you don't know to be useful, or believe to be beautiful."
Sign In or Register to comment.