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Portuguese Laurels

Hi everyone 

I am new to the forum and new to gardens! Haha!

I have moved into my own property and the landscapers have planted portuguese laurels for privacy….

It provides no privacy and I’m wondering do these fill out? And if so how long? Should I plant something else alongside it?

thank you for any tips provided! 
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Posts

  • JoeXJoeX Posts: 1,783
    Yes they fill out, you’ll be fine for privacy over time.

    The thing about gardening is patience, that and soil quality.
  • You will need to keep your bushes well clipped because portugese laurel will grow very tall, 20-30 ft and very wide and bushy. The contractors will have used them because they are cheap.
    5 OR 6 YEARS and you will be complaining they are shutting out the light from your downstairs rooms.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 49,198
    Hi @sizer.lobular.0s -while they will be slow growing initially, assuming they establish well, they're cherry laurel rather than Portuguese. The latter is quite easy to keep neat and tight - while the former isn't ideal in that site as they get wide and hefty very easily.

    Get yourself a hedge trimmer or replace with something else if you don't like them  ;)

    It's a pity developers and landscapers don't think more carefully about what they stick in front of houses. You may find it difficult to access those power boxes/meters [?] at the door/window too. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Thank you both for your response.

    It’s much appreciated sounds like it’s going to take some years for these to fill out. I may look into privacy screens in the meantime. 
  • Fairygirl said:
    Hi @sizer.lobular.0s -while they will be slow growing initially, assuming they establish well, they're cherry laurel rather than Portuguese. The latter is quite easy to keep neat and tight - while the former isn't ideal in that site as they get wide and hefty very easily.

    Get yourself a hedge trimmer or replace with something else if you don't like them  ;)

    It's a pity developers and landscapers don't think more carefully about what they stick in front of houses. You may find it difficult to access those power boxes/meters [?] at the door/window too. 
    Thank you! 

    Gosh I have so much to learn! Haha 

    They definitely won’t replace them they have been a nightmare dealing with the company tbh. I had a feeling they didn’t plan the location…

    There are 3 gas boxes at the back as you mentioned so I will definitely buy a trimmer later down the line.

    Edward scissor hands here I come! 
  • GardenerSuzeGardenerSuze I garden in South Notts on an improved clay soil Posts: 3,134
    edited 5 January
    @sizer.lobular.0s I am going to give my honest opinion, you need to replace them with something smaller.
    You can keep them under control at the beginning but I had to pay a tree surgeon just to remove one.
    With gardening there is no such thing as instant privacy. plants of a good size. at a cheaper price. Your Laurels will grow fast and just keep going if left unpruned you will have thick trunks. Shrubs that are mature and slow growing have been cared for by a nurserymen for many years and they can be expensive. 
    Perhaps look over some garden walls when you are out and about I am sure you will see how big they can get.
    Sorry to be negative on your first post. You have a new garden that will be exciting and I hope you will continue to share your progress. Welcome.

    The most serious gardening I do would seem very strange to an onlooker,for it involves hours of walking round in circles,apparently doing nothing. Helen Dillon.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 49,198
    edited 5 January

    It's a pity developers and landscapers don't think more carefully about what they stick in front of houses. You may find it difficult to access those power boxes/meters [?] at the door/window too. 

    Edward scissor hands here I come! 
     :D 

    I don't think developers have a clue at all in many cases. Chuck in some grass on a tiny area, and some unsuitable hedging/trees/shrubs. Box ticked. Job done. 

    Hope you can find good solution. A blind might be the easiest one for now!
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • GardenerSuzeGardenerSuze I garden in South Notts on an improved clay soil Posts: 3,134
    Only the other day saw a new development with hundreds of Viburnum Tinus 3ft tall packed into every front garden on a road of luxury new homes. They don't have a clue.
    The most serious gardening I do would seem very strange to an onlooker,for it involves hours of walking round in circles,apparently doing nothing. Helen Dillon.
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 82,286
    Just don’t replace them with even cheaper Leylandii cypress. 
    If it were mine I think I’d spend on a few posts and sturdy trellis, then you could have evergreen Clematis Cirrhosa ‘Freckles’  or similar growing up it.  Virtually trouble free and low maintenance once it’s established. 

    We have one in a similar situation… just one plant has screened an area at least 2m x 2.5m and we can watch  the small birds hopping about in it from our sofa!  We put a Robin nestbox in it and last summer we watched a pair raise a family. 
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • UffUff SW Scotland but born in DerbyshirePosts: 3,045
    If you keep the laurels they will have achieved what you hope for before the end of the summer and then you will need to prune them to keep them tidy but not by using a hedge trimmer. They need clipping by hand using secateurs. If you don't you will be back asking why the edges of the leaves are turning brown and messy.  

    This is mine that I clip using secateurs.


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