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Which paving slabs to have?

herbaceousherbaceous OxfordshirePosts: 2,310
So, just moved into a new build with an odd shaped patio of standard riven sandstone slabs. Need to find pavers that don't get too slippy and been told ceramic is the way to go. Has anyone any experience of these through a hot summer and rainy winter?
Want to avoid lichen if possible but have decent hard paving for some big pots as I am now a container gardener.  Any help will be gratefully received.
"The trouble with having an open mind, of course, is that people will insist on coming along and trying to put things in it."  Sir Terry Pratchett
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  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 9,857
    I had a ceramic (porcelain) patio laid in 2019 using Bradstone Aspero.
    I'm really pleased with it.
    It's not slippy at all at any time of year.
    Cleaning is a breeze - just a bucket filled with warm water and a squirt of Fairy and a scrubber and it comes up like new. To make life a little easier I bought an electric scrubber.


    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • herbaceousherbaceous OxfordshirePosts: 2,310
    That looks really smart and your experience is really reassuring, thank you.  My experience of paving is at least 40 years old and this house is causing me to revisit so many choices for different reasons. Paving is so permanent isn't it?
    I love the colour too, just right for my patio! Name noted I'm off to Google.....
    "The trouble with having an open mind, of course, is that people will insist on coming along and trying to put things in it."  Sir Terry Pratchett
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 9,857
    Happy hunting!!
    When I researched porcelain slabs I found that lots are now made in China and the quality is poor. Some slabs are sold as being Italian when actually they're made in China then shipped to Italy then sold on as Italian porcelain.
    The most reliable country of manufacture is apparently Turkey.
    I don't know where Bradstone tiles are made, but they are one of the best suppliers - Marshalls are also very good.
    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • herbaceousherbaceous OxfordshirePosts: 2,310
    Thank you again for the heads up! Turkey it is then. I'll tell you something else about equipping a new house after living in my last one for nearly fifty years, I find myself astonished at the price of stuff. I am getting used to it a bit but my have things moved on.
    Found several suppliers so once the holidays are over and everyone has sobered up I'm on the phone I reckon.
    "The trouble with having an open mind, of course, is that people will insist on coming along and trying to put things in it."  Sir Terry Pratchett
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 9,857
    I agree about the cost of everything these days.
    I'm so glad I had my house completely refurbished in 2019 as I doubt I could afford the same stuff now due to the huge increase in the cost of just about everything.

    I'd suggest getting a quote from a Bradstone accredited installer then compare that with others.
    I'd intended having a new drive and patio around 2015 so I kept an eye locally on properties that were having new drives put in, make a note on the installer name then see how it looked after 2-3 years.
    One local installer always seemed to do a fine job and it was them that laid mine.
    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • herbaceousherbaceous OxfordshirePosts: 2,310
    Fortunately I have a bit left over from the sale of my last house but it certainly doesn't go far! My daughter had a local builder renew her patio last year so I was going to ask him to quote but I will certainly check out the accredited installers, got enough little niggles with the house so want this right first time. Fingers crossed.
    "The trouble with having an open mind, of course, is that people will insist on coming along and trying to put things in it."  Sir Terry Pratchett
  • a1154a1154 Sunny South Scotland Posts: 1,033
    That looks great Pete. OH is keen on porcelain but I had worries, so thanks for the info. 
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 9,857
    👍
    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • PlantmindedPlantminded Wirral (free draining sandy soil)Posts: 1,737
    I agree that porcelain is a much better option for you @herbaceous.  Your patio looks superb @Pete.8!  I had some rustic type steps built in a shady, damp part of my garden a couple of years ago.  I was concerned about slipping as I use them for carrying my lawn mower and other gardening equipment up to my lawn.  The contractor recommended porcelain tiles.  I chose some that looked like wood to complement the oak sleeper frame.  They have a slightly riven texture and are definitely not slippy when wet.  Plus, they don't get that green algae which needs regular cleaning on sandstone paving. (I have a lot of that elsewhere!).  Good luck with your project!

     
  • herbaceousherbaceous OxfordshirePosts: 2,310
    Thank you @Plantminded feeling more confident in the choice of pavers now although this is less of a project more a lifestyle change. Trying to come to terms with all the decisions I haven't had to mak for aloooong time  :*
    "The trouble with having an open mind, of course, is that people will insist on coming along and trying to put things in it."  Sir Terry Pratchett
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