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Help with privet

can anyone help can anyone tell me what is goi g on with my privet ?
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  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 48,902
    Have you a photo @coppard.sarah:)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • I’m hoping it’s the weather extremes 
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 48,902
    I'd say that's all it is.  :)
    I passed a large hedge today, along the boundary of a local cemetery. It usually looks great, but it's a sorry sight because of the recent weather. Privet isn't evergreen anyway, so in cold weather it can drop a lot of foliage, and look pretty poor. 
    Many privet hedges will have looked really good due to the mild autumn, so it's been a big change over a short period of time, and new growth in particular will have been affected. 

    They can be prone to honey fungus, but if that was the case with yours, you would probably have noticed a problem earlier this year. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • No just started bar one which has lost over the year  - I cut this back and removed . I will send photo but knowhere near the other privets 
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 48,902
    I think it's weather @coppard.sarah, and if you're in a cold part of the country, it's more likely to be that.
    I've never had honey fungus on any privet, and I can't remember what it looks like when it gets going, but I know some other folk on the forum have lost hedging to it . You would likely see evidence of the fungi around the base of the trunks too. 
    You can certainly look at something like the RHS site to get info on it, and see if that's a possibility. 


    Here's a link to the RHS - see if there's anything useful there.
    https://www.rhs.org.uk/disease/honey-fungus-managing-outbreaks
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • I hope so I have 3/4 of an acre of privet hedging !!! I will update you as it goes . Although I lost a really healthy cherry blossom this year also 
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 48,902
    Many people lost trees and shrubs this year due to drought, and the fact that there were many periods of varying weather[hot, wet, dry etc]  which were longer term than normal. That can have a cumulative effect, and often there are no signs until it's too late.
    I'm not sure if cherries are prone to honey fungus though. Again- you might find it worth having a search on the RHS or similar. If so, you may have a problem there. 

    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 48,902
    edited December 2022
    I just answered my own question @coppard.sarah. This is a link to a respected nursery  :/

    https://www.orangepippintrees.co.uk/articles/fruit-tree-advice/honey-fungus-fruit-trees#:~:text=Fruit trees that are susceptible to honey fungus infection&text=Cherry trees - since all rootstocks,hawthorn rootstocks, which are susceptible.&text=Peach trees - since all rootstocks used for nectarine trees are susceptible.

    I don't want to be a scaremonger, but it might be worth investigating. It would depend on how and why the cherry died though. I don't know if ornamental cherries are so susceptible either.
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


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