Forum home The potting shed

Sharing tips for keeping warm and being economical with fuel 🥶

I have been thinking about the best ways to keep warm, be efficient with heating sources and managing humidity/ condensation etc in the home. 

I noticed that public information has recommended just heating one key room in the day and the used bedrooms at night. Some of us have been doing that for years (frugal or efficient?). 

The big one for me is managing condensation. My gut is too open windows to create air flow and a route out for moisture, but then the cold air rushes in (and warm air out). Damp washing is a nightmare as the tumble drier uses an eye-watering amount of electricity but leaving damp washing/towels creates humidity. 

I bought an over-sized fleece jumper last year and that is wonderful. Same for thick fleecy or knitted socks. I have been known to have a hood or hat on to warm up too. Blankets/throws are a must. 

What do you all do to manage heat and moisture in the home? Any top tips for keeping warm? 


My garden and I live in South Wales. 
«13456716

Posts

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 49,160
    I've mostly put the heating on for drying washing, to save using the dryer, but I spend a lot of time faffing around and moving it about, and yes - condensation is a problem which also needs managed. My windows are double glazed, but most are older and don't have the little vents in them, so there's a lot of wiping down/squeegee action goes on!
    My younger daughter starts work early most days, so I set the heating to come on for her, and then I manage it manually, as I have one of those mobile thermostats.
    I don't have heating on in my bedroom - it's only on the frost setting, but I use one of those heat pads, which I use when I go to bed.
    In between times, I wear two fleeces and/or use a fleece throw when I'm just sitting.
    I can thoroughly recommend a fleece I got in Asda, and my daughter got one too. I can't remember the name of it, but it's huge, and has a hood, and you feel warm instantly when you put it on. It was about £16, if I remember correctly. 

    I've not had the heating on more than about an hour and a half each day, and that's only been this week when it's been consistently frosty/icy - ground has been frozen since Monday.   Last night it was minus 6, so I had the heating on for an extra 20 minutes this morning. It remains to be seen how much of a saving there is though. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • BenCottoBenCotto RutlandPosts: 4,050
    I’m astonished at how hardy some of you folk are. Our heating is at 20° for 10 hours a day.

    Not having, or wanting, a tumble drier we use the radiators for drying but surprisingly, again in the light of comments here, never experience condensation on the (double glazed) windows or evidence of mould. Perhaps the spin cycle on our washing machine is extra efficient.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 49,160
    It was a necessity for us to have a drier, due to the climate here, and when we were all out working etc, and because of the amount of washing we need to do. Three of us here, so three sets of bedclothes for a start. We've started doing those less often too, but we use the washing machine about 4 or 5 times a week.  Spin cycle is 1400, so it's pretty good in that respect @BenCotto .
    I hang washing out whenever possible, but there's no heat in the sun now, so if it isn't windy, there's little point in it going out.
    Our rooms aren't very big, and I try to avoid having washing near the windows. The kitchen gets the sun, so I often hang one of the airers in there, but it isn't always effective. I never put washing directly on the rads- stuff only goes on once the heating is switched off. I've had to get used to washing hanging around the house, which I hate. In the past, I often quote the glorious Richard Dreyfuss, in The Goodbye Girl. 'I don't like the panties drying on the rod' which describes my feelings about that. 
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xj_B5wblQC0

    I've always batch cooked etc, so I can't make savings that way. We use the oven when I make soup -usually with roast veg, so I'll cook other things in with that. We got an air fryer, but I'm not fully convinced about it yet. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • AuntyRachAuntyRach Posts: 4,780
    Well I have put some washing out today but as soon as it clouds over/the sun goes round then it will be brought in and I have recently installed a rail above my hot water tank to dry damp clothes. It works quite well. I do put a clothes horse next to a radiator if I’m stuck. 

    Re batch cooking - the new ‘rule’ is that if the oven is on then more then one thing must be cooked, even if it’s just some veg in a stock for a soup/casserole. I will be doing that later today alongside some sausages and maybe a cake or pud. Takes a bit more organising, but you definitely feel like you are winning at the fuel game. 
    My garden and I live in South Wales. 
  • McRazzMcRazz Posts: 144
    edited December 2022
    AuntyRach said:
    I have been thinking about the best ways to keep warm, be efficient with heating sources and managing humidity/ condensation etc in the home. 

    I noticed that public information has recommended just heating one key room in the day and the used bedrooms at night. Some of us have been doing that for years (frugal or efficient?). 

    The big one for me is managing condensation. My gut is too open windows to create air flow and a route out for moisture, but then the cold air rushes in (and warm air out). Damp washing is a nightmare as the tumble drier uses an eye-watering amount of electricity but leaving damp washing/towels creates humidity. 

    I bought an over-sized fleece jumper last year and that is wonderful. Same for thick fleecy or knitted socks. I have been known to have a hood or hat on to warm up too. Blankets/throws are a must. 

    What do you all do to manage heat and moisture in the home? Any top tips for keeping warm? 


    We suffered a power cut whilst we were away last month and our heating shut down. When we got back i reckon it took the house perhaps 3-4 days to warm its shell and core to the point where we didn't feel constantly chilled even with the heating on! I remain convinced that leaving rooms you don't use cold has a detrimental effect to energy efficiency and general warming of the house structure. Although i can't speak for new builds...

    In preparation for the winter we replaced some old windows with UPVC and have laid carpeting in the rooms which were previously cold, wooden floored. This has made a big improvement.

    On a micro scale we've been less picky with the stuff we burn on our open fire. Whilst it was almost exclusively seasoned hardwood (ash mostly), we've now started on pallets, old pine furniture (destined for the tip) and anything else that will burn cleanly (relatively speaking). 

    Also, obligatory soft cotton tracksuits and blankets are now the norm!

    Edit - Obligatory air fryer also saves us a packet on electric vs our fan oven!
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 49,160
    That's how we're doing it @AuntyRach, re the oven. 
    We have a slow cooker too, but I don't use it as much as I used to, because younger daughter can't eat beef as it makes her ill. We used to do goulash regularly. 
    I think that's definitely a problem @McRazz, if you're away, or have a power cut etc. I'd always leave rooms on the frost setting at this time of year if they weren't being used. I don't want any problems with the fabric of the building, especially as we get a lot of wet/damp weather.
    I'd agree re the carpets too. We have oak veneered flooring, and I often think I should change it to carpet. We have rugs though.
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • AuntyRachAuntyRach Posts: 4,780
    edited December 2022
    I think leaving rooms unheated isn’t ideal but it’s also hard to justify, particularly this Winter. 

    It’s interesting what other people, even in my own family, say about heating. Some are in the “wrap up” camp, others in the “I work hard so I’m not being cold at home” team, and some are a bit oblivious to the costs and are just a bit lazy. 

    Edit: I have the unused rooms on ‘frost’ setting but I have only noticed it kicking in once or twice ever. 
    My garden and I live in South Wales. 
  • McRazzMcRazz Posts: 144
    Fairygirl said:
    That's how we're doing it @AuntyRach, re the oven. 
    We have a slow cooker too, but I don't use it as much as I used to, because younger daughter can't eat beef as it makes her ill. We used to do goulash regularly. 
    I think that's definitely a problem @McRazz, if you're away, or have a power cut etc. I'd always leave rooms on the frost setting at this time of year if they weren't being used. I don't want any problems with the fabric of the building, especially as we get a lot of wet/damp weather.
    I'd agree re the carpets too. We have oak veneered flooring, and I often think I should change it to carpet. We have rugs though.
    The beauty of carpet is that it can essentially be laid on anything, so long as its flat, which can speed up the whole process of getting it laid short notice.

    Re the cold house. You're right, the fabric of the building really suffered. As it contracted all the walls and ceilings cracked practically undoing 2 years worth of decorating.
  • Songbird-2Songbird-2 Posts: 518
    edited December 2022
    If our kitchen was big enough, I would buy one of those lath pulley clothes airers, that pull up to the ceiling. I used to have one when the children were small for their nappies( terry's towels in those days) and my mum still has one in her kitchen. They are brilliant for getting the washing up and out of the way and as heat rises, it dries everything overnight. Mum swears by hers.


  • McRazzMcRazz Posts: 144
    edited December 2022
    AuntyRach said:
    I think leaving rooms unheated isn’t ideal but it’s also hard to justify, particularly this Winter. 

    It’s interesting what other people, even in my own family, say about heating. Some are in the “wrap up” camp, others in the “I work hard so I’m not being cold at home” team, and some are a bit oblivious to the costs and are just a bit lazy. 

    Edit: I have the unused rooms on ‘frost’ setting but I have only noticed it kicking in once or twice ever. 
    Its funny isn't it. I moved from a building site environment into a heated office about 5 years ago and my skin has definitely thinned in that time. There's nothing quite like sitting on a dumper truck for 8 hours getting buffeted by cold wind and rain to make you appreciate even a moderately heated room!
Sign In or Register to comment.