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2 shrubs to ID please

JAYJARDINJAYJARDIN North DevonPosts: 195
Hi All

Please can you ID these two. I know I have posted a lot to ID but there are lots of plants that I did not have in my previous garden and they are all planted far too close to each other so I need to select who is staying and who can be moved elsewhere, perhaps to the less congested front garden.
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Posts

  • Arthur1Arthur1 Posts: 528
    Viburnum tinus and Buxus sempervivum?
  • nutcutletnutcutlet PeterboroughPosts: 26,845
    I agree with @Arthur1
  • GardenerSuzeGardenerSuze I garden in South Notts on an improved clay soil Posts: 3,028
    Yes I agree too. I am sure you will know about the problems there are with box. Also Vibernum Beetle loves V Tinus. Do you have any flowers on the Viburnum it is winter flowering and will take a good prune after flowering in spring.
    I have also hard pruned Box in the past but it can take a long time to recover best done early May. When a garden is full of plants and overgrown the best way is to renovate and except that it might take time for some things to get back to looking their best.
    The most serious gardening I do would seem very strange to an onlooker,for it involves hours of walking round in circles,apparently doing nothing. Helen Dillon.
  • JAYJARDINJAYJARDIN North DevonPosts: 195
    Thanks everyone  :)
    The Virburnam doesn't have any flowers sadly.
    I may remove the Buxes as It's growing around the base of the Damson tree and looks out of place.

    Thanks @GardnerSuze for the pruning advice which I will follow.
  • cmarkrcmarkr Posts: 141
    If you know any bonsai enthusiasts @JAYJARDIN I'm sure they'd bight you're hand off for the box (and dig it up for you), it looks like it's a decent size (they'd cut it back to the 'trunk' and grow it into a bonsai from there).
  • GardenerSuzeGardenerSuze I garden in South Notts on an improved clay soil Posts: 3,028
    @JAYJARDIN I wouldn't ditch the buxus plants either. They could be carefully dug up in the spring minding the tree roots. You could move or pot up. Prune hard to a rough circular or cone shape, you may cut away most of the leaves but they will reshoot as part of an on going project.   Expensive to buy they can add a strong shape to a border full of more lax plants. Also useful in the winter garden.
    I am surprised your Viburnum has no flowers or tiny buds. If you look into the shrub are there signs that it has been pruned recently? Pruning at the wrong time of year is the only reason I can think of for the lack of flowers. 
    The most serious gardening I do would seem very strange to an onlooker,for it involves hours of walking round in circles,apparently doing nothing. Helen Dillon.
  • JAYJARDINJAYJARDIN North DevonPosts: 195
    @GardenerSuze I think I'll take your advice and in the Spring move it and prune it to a lovely shape. It will give some form to the garden
    As for pruning, nothing has been touched here for quite some years and that which has been pruned has been pruned very badly so I have my work cut out in the Spring getting things back into shape and taking the pruning cuts down to where they should be. The Viburnam is in a bad spot and in the shade, that may be why it has no flowers, so I may try and get that moved too. Lots to do ! Shame it's so cold out!
  • Busy-LizzieBusy-Lizzie Posts: 20,360
    Viburnum Tinus is OK with a bit of shade. It doesn't usually need pruning unless it's got out of shape or too big. It flowers very early in the year.
    Dordogne and Norfolk
  • GardenerSuzeGardenerSuze I garden in South Notts on an improved clay soil Posts: 3,028
     Large plants to the back then the middle layer with smaller plants to the front is the best way to set out a border. You can break the rules to add interest. The Viburnum belongs at the back, worth a thought because you only want to move it once. You have lots of plans for the spring moving large shrubs can be a slow job and hard work. It is important to have enough root to support the top growth.
     January was very dry as was spring and summer ,if we have a repeat you could be faced with a lot of watering too.
    The very best gardens evolve and yours is well worth the effort it has been lovingly cared for by a talented gardener in the past. I think they would be happy to know you are looking after it.

    Thankyou for your posts they have made me think. I hope to move next year so I have put together a plant list over the last few days of everything in the garden. I will be taking plants with me so it is helpful for that too. Maybe a copy for it's new owner might be helpful. However I do accept they may not like to garden, I am not sentimental I will have a new project exciting!
    The most serious gardening I do would seem very strange to an onlooker,for it involves hours of walking round in circles,apparently doing nothing. Helen Dillon.
  • JAYJARDINJAYJARDIN North DevonPosts: 195
    The past owner of the house didn't have any idea of where to place plants and has put large ones in the middle and small ones dotted around everywhere ! There will definitely be some moving of plants, but we need to have some landscaping and fences done in the garden first and anything large that needs to be moved can be done by whoever is landscaping.

    Before I put our previous house on the market I went around taking cuttings of lots of plants, mainly ones I had taken from my Mum and Dad's garden and had then grown in my own garden. I made sure I took two of each to hopefully ensure success.  I have had them in pots for 8 months now and most have taken so I'm happy ! Now Mum and Dad have passed, it is lovely to think I still have a part of them growing and hopefully to be planted in the new garden once it has some shape to it. I know they would be pleased about that ! It is as you say, very exciting to be planning a new garden and a house refurbishment. God only knows how I am finding time to work as well ! 

    I also left a plan of what was in my old garden for the new owner as she was an enthusiastic gardener- well she had to be as the garden was 120 foot long!


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