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Please can anyone help with these to ID ?

Would be really grateful to have a some more plants ID'd! I think the second one is a bamboo. Is this a really invasive one and if so what is the best way to remove it without leaving and traces of root? I think the third one is Parthenossis Quinquefolia. If it is what is the best way to eradicate it ? Thanks in advance.
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  • LoxleyLoxley Posts: 5,678
    I think the third is Akebia quinata. Why would you want to eradicate it?
    "What is hateful to you, do not do to your neighbour". 
  • The most commonly planted yellow-stemmed bamboo is Phyllostachys aurea, which is a clump forming sort.  I'm not sure how to ID it though.  Is it just in one place, or has it tried to wander - for example, is it on the other side of that fence?
    Since 2019 I've lived in east Clare, in the west of Ireland.
  • AnniDAnniD Posts: 12,451
    I think the second one is bamboo, Phyllostachys aurea. Not 100% certain though.

  • Loxley said:
    I think the third is Akebia quinata. Why would you want to eradicate it?

    Hi Loxley- I wasn't sure what it was and it is coming in from next door. Looked like a weed to me and there is lots of it all over the garden. When I looked it up I thought it may be Parthenosis Quinata.

    The most commonly planted yellow-stemmed bamboo is Phyllostachys aurea, which is a clump forming sort.  I'm not sure how to ID it though.  Is it just in one place, or has it tried to wander - for example, is it on the other side of that fence?

    Hi Liriodendron -There is no earth on the other side of that fence, just a path so it has been planted by a previous owner of the house. I don't have anh idea how long it has been there and how much it has spread.
  • punkdocpunkdoc Posts: 14,929
    I don't think anyone will be able to identify 1., without any leaves.
    How can you lie there and think of England
    When you don't even know who's in the team

    S.Yorkshire/Derbyshire border
  • Hmm, I thought as much ! I'll post it again when it has some leaves. It's not a fruiting tree.
  • You might need to keep a "watching brief" on the bamboo, in that case.  If it's not coming up through other plants, and you like it, it should be ok.  

    Someone on here who grows bamboos might be able to give you a definite ID though.
    Since 2019 I've lived in east Clare, in the west of Ireland.
  • wild edgeswild edges Posts: 10,429
    JAYJARDIN said:
    Hmm, I thought as much ! I'll post it again when it has some leaves. It's not a fruiting tree.
    I can still see one leaf on there.

    If you can keep your head, while those around you are losing theirs, you may not have grasped the seriousness of the situation.
  • JAYJARDIN said:
    Hmm, I thought as much ! I'll post it again when it has some leaves. It's not a fruiting tree.
    I can still see one leaf on there.

    1.  Hmmm!
    Those leaves  might well have blown in from another near by tree!!!

    To have any chance of being accurate I agree with all others need more clues...leaves, flowers, berries, seeds.

    Tree looks to be very close to the house.
    3. Agree Akebia quinata.


    Perthshire. SCOTLAND .
  • Akebia Quinata is beautiful and not that common. It will need to be kept under control cut back after flowering. There was a Gardener's World special on friday with some useful information on the different ways that bamboo grows in the garden at Trebah Cornwall. I would take a look as some are seriously invasive and can be very difficult to deal with if they really start to run. Do you know anything about your tree, difficult to tell fron a photo but you could look at Amelanchier to see 'if it rings any bells'.
     Retired Gardener, new build garden, clay soil, South Notts.


    The more I garden the less I know but the more pleasure I get from it. Monty Don 
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