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Changes in Compost

Hello, I'm new to gardening and would love some advice. I live in the West of Scotland.  I planted spring bulbs in pots during Oct/Nov and left them outside. Unfortunately the weather was very wet and as a result I decided to take the containers inside a plastic greenhouse I have. After 2-3 weeks (I have not watered as the compost still feels wet) the compost in a few of the pots has developed a greenish hue. Is this a cause for concern?
I would be very grateful for any advice. 
Many thanks. 
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Posts

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 82,276
    Without a photo my best guess is that it’s simply an algae or moss … I wouldn’t be concerned … as you say it’s probably because it got  a bit soggy … as long as the pots have good drainage holes it’ll get dryer. You could raise the pots up by putting them on bits of tile or similar (not covering the holes) and this helps drain the excess water more efficiently. 
    If you want the pots to look more attractive(rather than the green algae) you could put a layer of horticultural grit over the surface. 
    😊 
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 49,149
    I've replied on your other thread @francesmckeon21, as has another poster re your greenish hue.
    I'd agree with him and with @Dovefromabove. Grit or fine gravel always looks good and also keeps the plants clean. Rain splashing on open soil/compost is never very great, and certainly get pot feet if the pots are on a hard surface. You don't need to buy them - little offcuts of wood or tile will do the job, as Dove describes.

    Uncover them and let the air circulate - you're cosseting them too much  ;)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • francesmckeon21francesmckeon21 GlasgowPosts: 38
    Without a photo my best guess is that it’s simply an algae or moss … I wouldn’t be concerned … as you say it’s probably because it got  a bit soggy … as long as the pots have good drainage holes it’ll get dryer. You could raise the pots up by putting them on bits of tile or similar (not covering the holes) and this helps drain the excess water more efficiently. 
    If you want the pots to look more attractive(rather than the green algae) you could put a layer of horticultural grit over the surface. 
    😊 
    Thank you very much . I really appreciate everyone's help. 
  • francesmckeon21francesmckeon21 GlasgowPosts: 38
    Fairygirl said:
    I've replied on your other thread @francesmckeon21, as has another poster re your greenish hue.
    I'd agree with him and with @Dovefromabove. Grit or fine gravel always looks good and also keeps the plants clean. Rain splashing on open soil/compost is never very great, and certainly get pot feet if the pots are on a hard surface. You don't need to buy them - little offcuts of wood or tile will do the job, as Dove describes.

    Uncover them and let the air circulate - you're cosseting them too much  ;)
    I AM! My husband keeps telling me to leave them alone 😔 
    Thanks Fairygirl , as always your advice is invaluable. I know you live in the same part of the country as me so I appreciate your wisdom. 
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 49,149
    No probs @francesmckeon21. It's always good to ask the question, and you won't have done any harm, so don't worry   :)
    It's been very mild here again this autumn, and I don't know exactly where you are compared to me, but most of our coldest weather tends to be after the New Year. It still won't affect the plants you have though. Lots of wet is worse than dry cold, and it's only a problem if you have wet cold,  then a freeze, as it can affect the pots. Some are better than others, but if you have terracotta, it's always worth giving them a coat of varnish or PVA to protect them a bit more.   :)

    Oh - and don't let on to your hubby that we've said the same as he has. We'll just keep it between ourselves...  ;)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • punkdocpunkdoc Sheffield, Derbyshire border.Posts: 13,027
    If in doubt, your husband is always right [ ducks for cover ]
    There are ashtrays of emulsion,
    for the fag ends of the aristocracy.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 49,149
    That's a 'well skelped erse' for you @punkdoc ;)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • francesmckeon21francesmckeon21 GlasgowPosts: 38
    Fairygirl said:
    No probs @francesmckeon21. It's always good to ask the question, and you won't have done any harm, so don't worry   :)
    It's been very mild here again this autumn, and I don't know exactly where you are compared to me, but most of our coldest weather tends to be after the New Year. It still won't affect the plants you have though. Lots of wet is worse than dry cold, and it's only a problem if you have wet cold,  then a freeze, as it can affect the pots. Some are better than others, but if you have terracotta, it's always worth giving them a coat of varnish or PVA to protect them a bit more.   :)

    Oh - and don't let on to your hubby that we've said the same as he has. We'll just keep it between ourselves...  ;)
    Lol 😀  I came clean about the plant.orotection advice 🙃
    I'm in Glasgow so it can be very wet. 
  • bédébédé Surrey Hills, acid greensand.Posts: 1,369
    edited December 2022
    Fairygirl said:
    terracotta, it's always worth giving them a coat of varnish or PVA to protect them a bit more.
    Both would turn terracotta into non-breathable plastic, so spoiling their aesthetic and functional benefits.    PVA is water sensitive so wouldn't last long.

    If you don't like chemicals, better avoid using them.
    "Have nothing in your garden that you don't know to be useful, or believe to be beautiful."
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 49,149
    @bede - you're the gift that keeps on giving  :D
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


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