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Osteospermum Sennen Sunrise

This is a perennial and now it has finished flowering. Do I need to cut it back as the leaves are still green, but it looks a bit straggly.  If I need to do this, when is the best time.  Everyone has been so helpful in the past.  Thank you.

Posts

  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 54,817
    I would only deadhead it and then leave it. 
    Many osteospermums aren't hardy, and the less hardy ones will only manage if you're in a very mild, or sheltered location. If that's the case, you may need to lift it  [if it's in the ground] and bring it inside - a frost free greenhouse or a porch or similar.  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
  • punkdocpunkdoc Posts: 14,958
    O. Sennen sunrise is half hardy, so is unlikely to survive outside, except in the mildest places.
    How can you lie there and think of England
    When you don't even know who's in the team

    S.Yorkshire/Derbyshire border
  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 54,817
    Not one I know @punkdoc, so I thought it might not be hardy. 
    I had a look and they do look nice though. I see the RHS has it at no 3 for hardiness levels. No use for you or me  then  :)

    You could take cuttings @macfall, and overwinter those indoors to give you plenty of plants for next year. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
  • @macfall Their is a purplish pink Osteospermum that is hardy, it has been growing in a raised bed locally for a long time. I have been aware of it probably twenty plus years  before the introduction of all the different colours. The flower colour might be an indication of it's hardiness. I have never known it's full name it scrambles about and can make 3ft in a season if happy. 
    However I doubt it would have a name like O Sennen Sunrise it does sound like a later introduction. I would take the advice given above and if anyone can help with a name for the old variety I would like to know I would think it has a latin name.
     Retired Gardener, new build garden, clay soil, South Notts.


    The more I garden the less I know but the more pleasure I get from it. Monty Don 
  • AnniDAnniD Posts: 12,459
    I think the one you're thinking of might be "Stardust" @GardenerSuze. It was introduced in the 1990s if memory serves me right. I used to have several plants and they were pretty tough, all things considered.
  • @AnniD Thankyou that looks very much like the plant I am referring to and yes I would say that they are pretty tough. 
     Retired Gardener, new build garden, clay soil, South Notts.


    The more I garden the less I know but the more pleasure I get from it. Monty Don 
  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 54,817
    Yes - there's one that's pretty hardy in most areas. Couldn't have told you the name of it, but I certainly had one at some point. I expect the one @AnniD mentions is it though. I probably just bought it because I liked the look of it at the time   :)
    Of course, it may have been another of the less hardy ones, and I'd have wondered why it didn't survive!
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
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