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Osteospermum Sennen Sunrise

This is a perennial and now it has finished flowering. Do I need to cut it back as the leaves are still green, but it looks a bit straggly.  If I need to do this, when is the best time.  Everyone has been so helpful in the past.  Thank you.

Posts

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 48,959
    I would only deadhead it and then leave it. 
    Many osteospermums aren't hardy, and the less hardy ones will only manage if you're in a very mild, or sheltered location. If that's the case, you may need to lift it  [if it's in the ground] and bring it inside - a frost free greenhouse or a porch or similar.  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • punkdocpunkdoc Sheffield, Derbyshire border.Posts: 13,022
    O. Sennen sunrise is half hardy, so is unlikely to survive outside, except in the mildest places.
    There are ashtrays of emulsion,
    for the fag ends of the aristocracy.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 48,959
    Not one I know @punkdoc, so I thought it might not be hardy. 
    I had a look and they do look nice though. I see the RHS has it at no 3 for hardiness levels. No use for you or me  then  :)

    You could take cuttings @macfall, and overwinter those indoors to give you plenty of plants for next year. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • GardenerSuzeGardenerSuze I garden in South Notts on an improved clay soil Posts: 3,052
    @macfall Their is a purplish pink Osteospermum that is hardy, it has been growing in a raised bed locally for a long time. I have been aware of it probably twenty plus years  before the introduction of all the different colours. The flower colour might be an indication of it's hardiness. I have never known it's full name it scrambles about and can make 3ft in a season if happy. 
    However I doubt it would have a name like O Sennen Sunrise it does sound like a later introduction. I would take the advice given above and if anyone can help with a name for the old variety I would like to know I would think it has a latin name.
    The most serious gardening I do would seem very strange to an onlooker,for it involves hours of walking round in circles,apparently doing nothing. Helen Dillon.
  • AnniDAnniD South West UKPosts: 10,995
    I think the one you're thinking of might be "Stardust" @GardenerSuze. It was introduced in the 1990s if memory serves me right. I used to have several plants and they were pretty tough, all things considered.
  • GardenerSuzeGardenerSuze I garden in South Notts on an improved clay soil Posts: 3,052
    @AnniD Thankyou that looks very much like the plant I am referring to and yes I would say that they are pretty tough. 
    The most serious gardening I do would seem very strange to an onlooker,for it involves hours of walking round in circles,apparently doing nothing. Helen Dillon.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 48,959
    Yes - there's one that's pretty hardy in most areas. Couldn't have told you the name of it, but I certainly had one at some point. I expect the one @AnniD mentions is it though. I probably just bought it because I liked the look of it at the time   :)
    Of course, it may have been another of the less hardy ones, and I'd have wondered why it didn't survive!
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


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