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AMELANCHIER LAMARCKII

GardenerSuzeGardenerSuze I garden in South Notts on an improved clay soil Posts: 3,051
I have an Amelanchier that was planted five years ago and is about five ft tall. I would like to pot it up as I hope to move house next year. I do have a huge pot for it. I wondered if anyone has moved one successfully and if they could give me any advice.  Maybe it is a bad idea? Would appreciate your thoughts.
The most serious gardening I do would seem very strange to an onlooker,for it involves hours of walking round in circles,apparently doing nothing. Helen Dillon.
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  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 48,954
    Not something I've done, but it's certainly possible to move large shrubs by digging a thin trench in a circle, at a decent distance from the base. It's then left in situ, so that new, fine roots are created, to support the shrub. After a period of time, it's then possible to dig out and move it.
    They did it on Beechgrove a few years ago with a Camellia [I think] which was then successfully moved. 
    There may not be enough time though. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • GardenerSuzeGardenerSuze I garden in South Notts on an improved clay soil Posts: 3,051
    @Fairygirl I was thinking I had seen it on Beechgrove but had no idea what time of year they dug the trench. I think it will be a minimum  of four months. Guess if timing was wrong it would then have to stay.
    The most serious gardening I do would seem very strange to an onlooker,for it involves hours of walking round in circles,apparently doing nothing. Helen Dillon.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 48,954
    As it's only been in 5 years, it might be ok to move  :)
    I expect you'd just have to have a wee furtle around and see what you think. I can't remember how long they left it before digging out, but it had been there a long time - it was a decent size of shrub. 

    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • WoodgreenWoodgreen Posts: 1,273
    edited November 2022
    I was given one by a friend in the spring (early March.) It had been dug up from her garden and was about 5 ft tall but had only been planted about three years I think. I trimmed any damage on the roots and planted it in the ground, with a little support. It has taken very well.

    Had I been putting it into a large pot I would have had to shorten the roots and may have taken a little bit off the shoots as well, without spoiling the shape. Amelanchiers aren't foliage heavy, as youll know @GardenerSuze, so I think it should be fine as long as the pot is big enough and it's kept well watered. Leaving it until spring could be riskier if the ground and conditions become very dry again where you are.

    edited to add, I think Fairygirl's suggestion of having a look around the root area is a good one. If you then feel it would be too large to pot up you could leave it knowing it will survive for others to enjoy. Conditions vary so much, but you know your garden and climate.

  • AnniDAnniD South West UKPosts: 10,994
    You could have a look at this, around 0:29.
    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p02p6ncq
  • GardenerSuzeGardenerSuze I garden in South Notts on an improved clay soil Posts: 3,051
    edited November 2022
    I have pruned it over the years and it now has a lovely shape with three main stems.
    It isn't as big as the shrub on Beechgrove but I would still move it in the same way. Thankyou to you all for your kind advice. I will take a look tomorrow. 
    The most serious gardening I do would seem very strange to an onlooker,for it involves hours of walking round in circles,apparently doing nothing. Helen Dillon.
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 9,854
    They're quite vigorous suckering shrubs.
    I imagine so long as you can get at least a lump of it out, it would soon reshoot and grow away well.
    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 28,551
    edited November 2022
    Do it while it's dormant and it may not even notice as long as you get a good root ball and give it decent compost @GardenerSuze.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • GardenerSuzeGardenerSuze I garden in South Notts on an improved clay soil Posts: 3,051
    @Obelixx Thank you I did think whilst it was dormant is the right time but it's good to get other opinions.
    The most serious gardening I do would seem very strange to an onlooker,for it involves hours of walking round in circles,apparently doing nothing. Helen Dillon.
  • robairdmacraignilrobairdmacraignil CorkPosts: 669
    edited November 2022
    Pete.8 said:
    They're quite vigorous suckering shrubs.
    I imagine so long as you can get at least a lump of it out, it would soon reshoot and grow away well.

    The one I planted originally about eight years back produced lots of suckers soon after it was first planted. This may be because it is planted in fairly shallow soil. I wanted to try keep it going as one main stem as a tree rather than a shrub and dug out all of the suckers and planted them in other parts of the garden. Only some of these had noticeable pieces of root and I think almost all of them took well to growing in their new positions. Some of these transplants are now bigger than the original tree. I agree with Pete and think there should be a good chance of success in moving one when its dormant.

    Happy gardening!
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