Forum home Problem solving

How to get rid of moss?

Hi

What's the best way to get rid of moss on the concrete please? Got quite abit building up and getting slippy

Thank you
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  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 49,060
    A stiff brush and some soapy water is probably the best for removing it, but if the conditions are suitable, it'll return. Some people put a layer of coarse sand down on hard surfaces to help, especially if it's a path or a route that's regularly used.  :)

    Is that the sort of scenario you have @pebblesbrennan4PC0yPWI?
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Use Patio Magic.  Spray on, following the instructions on the bottle, and leave.  You need to do it on a dry day where there is no rain after application for at least 6 hours.  Once the moss is dead sweep it up with a broom.
  • bédébédé Surrey Hills, acid greensand.Posts: 1,342
    edited November 2022
    Sand/grit is a good short. term answer to the slipperiness.

    There are several commercial path moss killers.  Jeyes fluid is an old favourite; it smells like it does a good job.  (the smell soon fades outdors)

    For patches around my pond I use boiling water, so no harm to fish or plants.

    If there is a lot, physical removal will be needed as well.
    "Have nothing in your garden that you don't know to be useful, or believe to be beautiful."
  • LiriodendronLiriodendron Scariff, County Clare, IrelandPosts: 7,868
    Jeyes Fluid might smell as if it's doing a good job, but it's very harmful to fish, cats, and if ingested or absorbed through the skin, humans.
    "The one who plants trees, knowing that he will never sit in their shade, has at least started to understand the meaning of life."  Rabindranath Tagore
  • bédébédé Surrey Hills, acid greensand.Posts: 1,342
    edited November 2022
    Lirio:  It's not up to us posters to list all the how-to-use information and health-and-
     safety warnings.  I treat all readers as responsible adults who will do their own due diligence.  E&OE.

    By-the-way, how do I add a little message at the bottom of a post?
    "Have nothing in your garden that you don't know to be useful, or believe to be beautiful."
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 49,060
    Jeyes Fluid might smell as if it's doing a good job, but it's very harmful to fish, cats, and if ingested or absorbed through the skin, humans.
    As is boiling water poured on soil. Kills all sorts of invertebrates etc  :/

    Unfortunately - not all adults are responsible [in all sorts of ways]  and we see it regularly on the forum, so showing the other side of the coin is also important. That's what forum members do .  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • LiriodendronLiriodendron Scariff, County Clare, IrelandPosts: 7,868
    "It smells like it does a good job" is not a particularly good recommendation, @bédé,  IMO.  Many visitors to the forum have little gardening experience, and I feel it's my responsibility to tell them what I know about the environmental consequences of what's being suggested.  Like you, apparently, I have no idea if Jeyes Fluid would work to control moss, but I do know why I wouldn't use it.
    "The one who plants trees, knowing that he will never sit in their shade, has at least started to understand the meaning of life."  Rabindranath Tagore
  • Arthur1Arthur1 Posts: 533
    Boiling water also has environmental consequences due to the carbon footprint of electricity. When it comes to recommendations,  where do you stop?
  • bédébédé Surrey Hills, acid greensand.Posts: 1,342
    edited November 2022
    Where do you stop.  Indeed.

    I think the best one can do is give posters some answers and let them choose.  DYOR.

    BTW, I do know that Jeyes Fluid works, I use it every year in my greenhouse.   That it has a disinfectanty smell was just a throw-away comment.  One can always find reasons for not doing anything.

    It is very bourgeoise to do anything unessential that costs money.  But I guess that's what we western gardeners are, bourgeoise.  
    nb.  "bourgeoise" knowingly chosen to be feminine.
    "Have nothing in your garden that you don't know to be useful, or believe to be beautiful."
  • I use a small pressure washer...does the job pretty well.
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