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How to soften impact of newly added garden cabin

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  • JennyJJennyJ Posts: 10,434
    I like @Fairygirl 's blue line.
    A flat spade will be fine to cut the new edge and lift the turf (you can stack it upside-down somewhere to rot down, then put it on the borders). It's not worth buying an edger unless you'd use it regularly.
    Doncaster, South Yorkshire. Soil type: sandy, well-drained
  • PlantmindedPlantminded Posts: 3,484
    Another vote for @Fairygirl's blue line!  A more natural flow which will enable you to cover a lot of the lower part with your chosen plants.
    Wirral. Sandy, free draining soil.


  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 54,836
    I always use a border spade. Much easier.  Mine is quite small and neat, and I've had it for around  30 years [maybe more] so the blade is quite sharp though.  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
  • JennyJJennyJ Posts: 10,434
    So do I. it's smaller and lighter than a full-size spade, which suits me. And not too long in the handle. Whatever suits you though, as long as the cutting edge is straight (a curved one would give a scalloped edge, not what you want).
    Doncaster, South Yorkshire. Soil type: sandy, well-drained
  • GardenerSuzeGardenerSuze Posts: 5,630
    A sharpe tool is the best, you may find a friend or neighbour will lend you a half moon cutter, to give it a go and see if you like it. I would take your time if it is something you haven't done before, just look from both ends of the border to check you are happy. You can correct things but that can be the hard way to tackle it. You will have a lovely deep border which always works well.
     Retired Gardener, new build garden, clay soil, South Notts.


    The more I garden the less I know but the more pleasure I get from it. Monty Don 
  • JennyJJennyJ Posts: 10,434
    You can mark out the new edge with a length of hose (if it's not kinky from being wound up), rope, sand trickled on, water-based paint, etc. If you cut the line and just lever the edge of the turf up a bit you'll be able to have a good look before you actually lift any turf, and if it's not right, tread it back down again and try again.
    Doncaster, South Yorkshire. Soil type: sandy, well-drained
  • PlantmindedPlantminded Posts: 3,484
    edited January 2023
    @Ivy2 , it's easier to lift the turf if you cut the area into manageable squares or rectangles first - like portioning brownies or flapjacks!  Then just slide your spade beneath each square and lift.  It gets easier after lifting the first square so that you can judge the right depth to get all the roots.
    Wirral. Sandy, free draining soil.


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